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Plasma potassium may protect sodium pumps of toad hearts from an endogenous inhibitor

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Resibufogenin (3-hydroxy-14,15-epoxy-20,22-dienolide glycoside) is a potent sodium pump inhibitor present in toad toxin. It is present in the skin of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) at a concentration equivalent to ouabain of ~1 mM. Because toads, like other amphibians, have permeable skin, resibufogenin is also found in high concentrations in the blood. In the cane toad the blood concentration is estimated to be 1 μM (D. Lichtstein, S. Kachalsky, and J. Deutsch. Life Sci. 38: 1261-1270, 1986; D. Lichtstein, S. Samuelov, J. Deutsch, H. Xu, R. A. Lutz, S. S. Chernick and S. S. Chernick. Klin. Wochenschr. 65, Suppl. 8: 40-48, 1987), a concentration thousands of times that required to produce toxicity in humans (J. S. Flier, E. Matatos- Flier, J. A. Pallotta, and D. McIsaac. Nature Lond. 279: 341-343, 1979). In examining how the cane toad avoids inhibiting its own sodium pumps, work on the heart showed that 1) cane toads possess a similar number of cardiac sodium pumps as other vertebrates, and 2) normal plasma K+ levels completely prevent ouabain, and presumably resibufogenin, from binding to cardiac sodium pumps of the cane toad. Other species, i.e., rat (Rattus norvegicus) and salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum), did not show K+ protection of their cardiac ouabain binding sites up to normal plasma K+ levels. These species do not possess the high level of endogenous ouabain-like substance found in the toad. K+ demonstrated a capacity to protect the enzymatic activity of the toad heart sodium pumps from the inhibitory effects of ouabain.

Publication Date


  • 1994

Citation


  • Else, P. L. (1994). Plasma potassium may protect sodium pumps of toad hearts from an endogenous inhibitor. American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 267(3 36-3). doi:10.1152/ajpregu.1994.267.3.r754

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028094933

Volume


  • 267

Issue


  • 3 36-3

Abstract


  • Resibufogenin (3-hydroxy-14,15-epoxy-20,22-dienolide glycoside) is a potent sodium pump inhibitor present in toad toxin. It is present in the skin of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) at a concentration equivalent to ouabain of ~1 mM. Because toads, like other amphibians, have permeable skin, resibufogenin is also found in high concentrations in the blood. In the cane toad the blood concentration is estimated to be 1 μM (D. Lichtstein, S. Kachalsky, and J. Deutsch. Life Sci. 38: 1261-1270, 1986; D. Lichtstein, S. Samuelov, J. Deutsch, H. Xu, R. A. Lutz, S. S. Chernick and S. S. Chernick. Klin. Wochenschr. 65, Suppl. 8: 40-48, 1987), a concentration thousands of times that required to produce toxicity in humans (J. S. Flier, E. Matatos- Flier, J. A. Pallotta, and D. McIsaac. Nature Lond. 279: 341-343, 1979). In examining how the cane toad avoids inhibiting its own sodium pumps, work on the heart showed that 1) cane toads possess a similar number of cardiac sodium pumps as other vertebrates, and 2) normal plasma K+ levels completely prevent ouabain, and presumably resibufogenin, from binding to cardiac sodium pumps of the cane toad. Other species, i.e., rat (Rattus norvegicus) and salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum), did not show K+ protection of their cardiac ouabain binding sites up to normal plasma K+ levels. These species do not possess the high level of endogenous ouabain-like substance found in the toad. K+ demonstrated a capacity to protect the enzymatic activity of the toad heart sodium pumps from the inhibitory effects of ouabain.

Publication Date


  • 1994

Citation


  • Else, P. L. (1994). Plasma potassium may protect sodium pumps of toad hearts from an endogenous inhibitor. American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 267(3 36-3). doi:10.1152/ajpregu.1994.267.3.r754

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028094933

Volume


  • 267

Issue


  • 3 36-3