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Effects of balance cues and experience on serial recall of human movement

Journal Article


Abstract


  • One way that student dancers learn new contemporary dance, hip-hop or ballroom dancing is by observing and reproducing dance phrases or steps. For experts, learning long and complex sequences may appear effortless whereas for those new to dance, the task is challenging with both motor and cognitive demands. On the cognitive side, the first stage for increasing familiarity or perceptual fluency is registering or encoding material in the short-term memory. With rehearsal, the material may be transferred subsequently to the long-term memory. Theories propose that human memory is cue driven - The more cues that are present while taking information in, that are also present at the time of retrieving the information, the better the recall. In this study, we investigate proprioceptive cues related to relative stability, as cues to short-term memory for recalling a series of simple body movements. We ask: is the feeling of either being in a balanced or unbalanced standing position a cue to short-term memory for movement material? And, if so, are such proprioceptive cues moderated by dance experience?

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Wachowicz, F., Stevens, C. J., & Byron, T. P. (2011). Effects of balance cues and experience on serial recall of human movement. Dance Research, 29(2), 450-468. doi:10.3366/drs.2011.0028

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84874566927

Start Page


  • 450

End Page


  • 468

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • One way that student dancers learn new contemporary dance, hip-hop or ballroom dancing is by observing and reproducing dance phrases or steps. For experts, learning long and complex sequences may appear effortless whereas for those new to dance, the task is challenging with both motor and cognitive demands. On the cognitive side, the first stage for increasing familiarity or perceptual fluency is registering or encoding material in the short-term memory. With rehearsal, the material may be transferred subsequently to the long-term memory. Theories propose that human memory is cue driven - The more cues that are present while taking information in, that are also present at the time of retrieving the information, the better the recall. In this study, we investigate proprioceptive cues related to relative stability, as cues to short-term memory for recalling a series of simple body movements. We ask: is the feeling of either being in a balanced or unbalanced standing position a cue to short-term memory for movement material? And, if so, are such proprioceptive cues moderated by dance experience?

Publication Date


  • 2011

Citation


  • Wachowicz, F., Stevens, C. J., & Byron, T. P. (2011). Effects of balance cues and experience on serial recall of human movement. Dance Research, 29(2), 450-468. doi:10.3366/drs.2011.0028

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84874566927

Start Page


  • 450

End Page


  • 468

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 2