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Differential preservation of vertebrates in Southeast Asian caves

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Caves have been an important source of vertebrate fossils for much of Southeast Asia, particularly for the Quaternary. Despite this importance, the mechanisms by which vertebrate remains accumulate and preserve in Southeast Asian caves has never been systematically reviewed or examined. Here, we present the results of three years of cave surveys in Indonesia and Timor-Leste, describing cave systems and their attendant vertebrate accumulations in diverse geological, biogeographical, and environmental settings. While each cave system is unique, we find that the accumulation and preservation of vertebrate remains are highly dependent on local geology and environment. These factors notwithstanding, we find the dominant factor responsible for faunal deposition is the presence or absence of biological accumulating agents, a factor directly dictated by biogeographical history. In small, isolated, volcanic islands, the only significant accumulation occurs in archaeological settings, thereby limiting our understanding of the palaeontology of those islands prior to human arrival. In karstic landscapes on both oceanic and continental islands, our understanding of the longterm preservation of vertebrates is still in its infancy. The formation processes of vertebratebearing breccias, their taphonomic histories, and the criteria used to determine whether these represent syngenetic or multiple deposits remain critically understudied. The latter in particular has important implications for arguments on how breccia deposits from the region should be analysed and interpreted when reconstructing palaeoenvironments.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Louys, J., Kealy, S., O¿Connor, S., Price, G. J., Hawkins, S., Aplin, K., . . . Clark, T. (2017). Differential preservation of vertebrates in Southeast Asian caves. International Journal of Speleology, 46(3), 379-408. doi:10.5038/1827-806X.46.3.2131

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85031280837

Start Page


  • 379

End Page


  • 408

Volume


  • 46

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • Caves have been an important source of vertebrate fossils for much of Southeast Asia, particularly for the Quaternary. Despite this importance, the mechanisms by which vertebrate remains accumulate and preserve in Southeast Asian caves has never been systematically reviewed or examined. Here, we present the results of three years of cave surveys in Indonesia and Timor-Leste, describing cave systems and their attendant vertebrate accumulations in diverse geological, biogeographical, and environmental settings. While each cave system is unique, we find that the accumulation and preservation of vertebrate remains are highly dependent on local geology and environment. These factors notwithstanding, we find the dominant factor responsible for faunal deposition is the presence or absence of biological accumulating agents, a factor directly dictated by biogeographical history. In small, isolated, volcanic islands, the only significant accumulation occurs in archaeological settings, thereby limiting our understanding of the palaeontology of those islands prior to human arrival. In karstic landscapes on both oceanic and continental islands, our understanding of the longterm preservation of vertebrates is still in its infancy. The formation processes of vertebratebearing breccias, their taphonomic histories, and the criteria used to determine whether these represent syngenetic or multiple deposits remain critically understudied. The latter in particular has important implications for arguments on how breccia deposits from the region should be analysed and interpreted when reconstructing palaeoenvironments.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Louys, J., Kealy, S., O¿Connor, S., Price, G. J., Hawkins, S., Aplin, K., . . . Clark, T. (2017). Differential preservation of vertebrates in Southeast Asian caves. International Journal of Speleology, 46(3), 379-408. doi:10.5038/1827-806X.46.3.2131

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85031280837

Start Page


  • 379

End Page


  • 408

Volume


  • 46

Issue


  • 3