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Making sense of self-reported practice impacts after online dementia education: The example of Bedtime to Breakfast and beyond

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objectives: To satisfy requirements for continuing professional education, workforce demand for access to large-scale continuous professional education and micro-credential-style online courses is increasing. This study examined the Knowledge Translation (KT) outcomes for a short (2 h) online course about support at night for people living with dementia (Bedtime to Breakfast), delivered at a national scale by the Dementia Training Australia (DTA). Methods: A sample of the first cohort of course completers was re-contacted after 3 months to complete a KT follow-up feedback survey (n = 161). In addition to potential practice impacts in three domains (Conceptual, Instrumental, Persuasive), respondents rated the level of Perceived Improvement in Quality of Care (PIQOC), using a positively packed global rating scale. Results: Overall, 93.8% of the respondents agreed that the course had made a difference to the support they had provided for people with dementia since the completion of the course. In addition to anticipated Conceptual impacts (e.g., change in knowledge), a range of Instrumental and Persuasive impacts were also reported, including workplace guidelines development and knowledge transfer to other staff. Tally counts for discrete KT outcomes were high (median 7/10) and explained 23% of the variance in PIQOC ratings. Conclusions: Online short courses delivered at a national scale are capable of supporting a range of translation-to-practice impacts, within the constraints of retrospective insight into personal practice change. Topics around self-assessed knowledge-to-practice and the value of positively packed rating scales for increasing variance in respondent feedback are discussed.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Goodenough, B., Watts, J., & Bartlett, S. (2020). Making sense of self-reported practice impacts after online dementia education: The example of Bedtime to Breakfast and beyond. Brain Impairment, 21(3), 299-313. doi:10.1017/BrImp.2020.19

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85096696975

Start Page


  • 299

End Page


  • 313

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • Objectives: To satisfy requirements for continuing professional education, workforce demand for access to large-scale continuous professional education and micro-credential-style online courses is increasing. This study examined the Knowledge Translation (KT) outcomes for a short (2 h) online course about support at night for people living with dementia (Bedtime to Breakfast), delivered at a national scale by the Dementia Training Australia (DTA). Methods: A sample of the first cohort of course completers was re-contacted after 3 months to complete a KT follow-up feedback survey (n = 161). In addition to potential practice impacts in three domains (Conceptual, Instrumental, Persuasive), respondents rated the level of Perceived Improvement in Quality of Care (PIQOC), using a positively packed global rating scale. Results: Overall, 93.8% of the respondents agreed that the course had made a difference to the support they had provided for people with dementia since the completion of the course. In addition to anticipated Conceptual impacts (e.g., change in knowledge), a range of Instrumental and Persuasive impacts were also reported, including workplace guidelines development and knowledge transfer to other staff. Tally counts for discrete KT outcomes were high (median 7/10) and explained 23% of the variance in PIQOC ratings. Conclusions: Online short courses delivered at a national scale are capable of supporting a range of translation-to-practice impacts, within the constraints of retrospective insight into personal practice change. Topics around self-assessed knowledge-to-practice and the value of positively packed rating scales for increasing variance in respondent feedback are discussed.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Goodenough, B., Watts, J., & Bartlett, S. (2020). Making sense of self-reported practice impacts after online dementia education: The example of Bedtime to Breakfast and beyond. Brain Impairment, 21(3), 299-313. doi:10.1017/BrImp.2020.19

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85096696975

Start Page


  • 299

End Page


  • 313

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 3