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Needle pain severity in children: Does the relationship between self-report and observed behaviour vary as a function of age?

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Reactions to needle pain were observed in children aged 3 to 17 years undergoing venipuncture. The primary aim was to determine whether agreement between observer ratings and children's self-report of pain varied as a function of the age of the child. A second aim was to explore which factors predicted whether a child spontaneously chose to watch the needle, and whether ooking behaviour was related to pain ratings. Results showed that correlations between behavioural and self-report measures were strongest for the 3-to 7-year-olds and weakest for the 12-to 17-year-olds. While the best predictor of self-report ratings was facial reaction for both the 8-to 11-and 12-to 17-year-olds, vocal and verbal reactions were also significant predictor variables for the 3-to 7-year-olds. The profile of a "non-looker" was a child who was older and had experienced few needles, who expected pain and was anxious about the procedure.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Goodenough, B., Champion, G. D., Laubreaux, L., Tabah, L., & Kampel, L. (1998). Needle pain severity in children: Does the relationship between self-report and observed behaviour vary as a function of age?. Australian Journal of Psychology, 50(1), 1-9. doi:10.1080/00049539808257524

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0040581167

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 50

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • Reactions to needle pain were observed in children aged 3 to 17 years undergoing venipuncture. The primary aim was to determine whether agreement between observer ratings and children's self-report of pain varied as a function of the age of the child. A second aim was to explore which factors predicted whether a child spontaneously chose to watch the needle, and whether ooking behaviour was related to pain ratings. Results showed that correlations between behavioural and self-report measures were strongest for the 3-to 7-year-olds and weakest for the 12-to 17-year-olds. While the best predictor of self-report ratings was facial reaction for both the 8-to 11-and 12-to 17-year-olds, vocal and verbal reactions were also significant predictor variables for the 3-to 7-year-olds. The profile of a "non-looker" was a child who was older and had experienced few needles, who expected pain and was anxious about the procedure.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Goodenough, B., Champion, G. D., Laubreaux, L., Tabah, L., & Kampel, L. (1998). Needle pain severity in children: Does the relationship between self-report and observed behaviour vary as a function of age?. Australian Journal of Psychology, 50(1), 1-9. doi:10.1080/00049539808257524

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0040581167

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 9

Volume


  • 50

Issue


  • 1