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Elevated body temperature contributes to the increased heart rate response during eccentric compared to concentric cycling when matched for oxygen consumption

Journal Article


Abstract


  • A cardiovascular requirement to facilitate thermal homeostasis may partly contribute to the elevated heart rate during eccentric cycling. This study compared the body temperature response to a bout of eccentric (ECC) and concentric (CON) cycling to account for the difference in heart rate. Eight (N = 8) aerobically trained males (age 35 y [SD 8], peak oxygen consumption 3.82 L.min−1 [SD 0.79]) completed an ECC cycling trial (60% PPO) followed by an oxygen consumption/duration matched CON trial (30 (Formula presented.), 35% RH) on a separate day. Trial termination was determined as an elevation in aural temperature, a surrogate of deep body temperature, by +0.5 (Formula presented.) during ECC. Mean skin (8-sites) and body temperature (weighting of 80:20 for auditory canal and mean skin temperature) were calculated. Matching the oxygen consumption between the trials increased external work during ECC cycling (CON: 71 [SD 14] ECC: 194 [SD 38] W, p < 0.05) and elevated aural temperature (+0.5 (Formula presented.)) by 20 min 32 s [SD 9 min 19 s] in that trial. The peak rate of rise in aural temperature was significantly greater in ECC (CON: 0.012 [SD 0.007] ECC: 0.031 [SD 0.002] oC.s−1, p < 0.05). Aural, mean skin and body temperature were significantly higher during the ECC trial (p < 0.05) and this was accompanied by elevated mean heart rate (CON: 103 [SD 14] ECC: 118 [SD 12] b.min−1, p < 0.05) and thermal discomfort (p < 0.05). Moderate load eccentric cycling imposes an elevated thermal strain when compared to concentric cycling. This requirement for dissipating heat, in part, explains the elevated heart rate during eccentric cycling.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Eiken, T., Harrison, A. J., Burdon, C. A., Groeller, H., & Peoples, G. E. (2021). Elevated body temperature contributes to the increased heart rate response during eccentric compared to concentric cycling when matched for oxygen consumption. Temperature, 8(1), 30-38. doi:10.1080/23328940.2020.1810199

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85091062193

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 30

End Page


  • 38

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • A cardiovascular requirement to facilitate thermal homeostasis may partly contribute to the elevated heart rate during eccentric cycling. This study compared the body temperature response to a bout of eccentric (ECC) and concentric (CON) cycling to account for the difference in heart rate. Eight (N = 8) aerobically trained males (age 35 y [SD 8], peak oxygen consumption 3.82 L.min−1 [SD 0.79]) completed an ECC cycling trial (60% PPO) followed by an oxygen consumption/duration matched CON trial (30 (Formula presented.), 35% RH) on a separate day. Trial termination was determined as an elevation in aural temperature, a surrogate of deep body temperature, by +0.5 (Formula presented.) during ECC. Mean skin (8-sites) and body temperature (weighting of 80:20 for auditory canal and mean skin temperature) were calculated. Matching the oxygen consumption between the trials increased external work during ECC cycling (CON: 71 [SD 14] ECC: 194 [SD 38] W, p < 0.05) and elevated aural temperature (+0.5 (Formula presented.)) by 20 min 32 s [SD 9 min 19 s] in that trial. The peak rate of rise in aural temperature was significantly greater in ECC (CON: 0.012 [SD 0.007] ECC: 0.031 [SD 0.002] oC.s−1, p < 0.05). Aural, mean skin and body temperature were significantly higher during the ECC trial (p < 0.05) and this was accompanied by elevated mean heart rate (CON: 103 [SD 14] ECC: 118 [SD 12] b.min−1, p < 0.05) and thermal discomfort (p < 0.05). Moderate load eccentric cycling imposes an elevated thermal strain when compared to concentric cycling. This requirement for dissipating heat, in part, explains the elevated heart rate during eccentric cycling.

Publication Date


  • 2021

Citation


  • Eiken, T., Harrison, A. J., Burdon, C. A., Groeller, H., & Peoples, G. E. (2021). Elevated body temperature contributes to the increased heart rate response during eccentric compared to concentric cycling when matched for oxygen consumption. Temperature, 8(1), 30-38. doi:10.1080/23328940.2020.1810199

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85091062193

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 30

End Page


  • 38

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 1