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The application of simulation (Virtual Reality) for safety training in the context of mining industry

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Virtual Reality (VR) technology has been used to train for various operations and dangerous circumstances where it is believed that training objectives cannot be achieved easily or the cost will prohibitive. Van Wyk and colleagues (2009) define VR-based training environments as “real-time computer simulations of the real world, in which visual realism, object behavior and user interaction are essential elements”. The use of VR-based training environments assumes that Human-Machine interaction stimulates learning processes through better experiencing and improved memorization, leading to a more effective transfer of the learning outcomes into workplace environments. However, there are many human factors (internally and externally), which have impact on the quality of the training and learning process which need to be identified and investigated. In this article, initially factors affecting the quality of the training and learning process for underground mine rescuers have been identified and then measured by using pre- and post-training questionnaires. Then statistical analyses have been performed to investigate the relationship among trainees’ perceived realism, usefulness and success. Also, trainers’ perception on 360-VR usefulness and success has been measured and compared with trainees. As the result of analysis indicated, trainees typically found the training sessions useful and perceived them to be successful; many felt that it was not really consistent with their real life experience. It would appear that perceived usefulness plays important role in forming the perception of success with high correlation and that the level of realism is not necessarily a deciding factor. Also, there was no significant difference between perceived usefulness and success between trainees and trainers. This research was conducted in collaboration with Mines Rescue Pty Ltd (a training provider for the coal mining industry in NSW, Australia) and was focused on training programs developed for mine rescue brigades. Data was collected from 94 mine rescue brigades (trainees) who attended a 360-VR training session over a twelvemonth period and 25 trainers who run the training sessions.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Pedram, S., Perez, P., Palmisano, S., & Farrelly, M. (2017). The application of simulation (Virtual Reality) for safety training in the context of mining industry. In Proceedings - 22nd International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, MODSIM 2017 (pp. 361-367).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85063933709

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 361

End Page


  • 367

Abstract


  • Virtual Reality (VR) technology has been used to train for various operations and dangerous circumstances where it is believed that training objectives cannot be achieved easily or the cost will prohibitive. Van Wyk and colleagues (2009) define VR-based training environments as “real-time computer simulations of the real world, in which visual realism, object behavior and user interaction are essential elements”. The use of VR-based training environments assumes that Human-Machine interaction stimulates learning processes through better experiencing and improved memorization, leading to a more effective transfer of the learning outcomes into workplace environments. However, there are many human factors (internally and externally), which have impact on the quality of the training and learning process which need to be identified and investigated. In this article, initially factors affecting the quality of the training and learning process for underground mine rescuers have been identified and then measured by using pre- and post-training questionnaires. Then statistical analyses have been performed to investigate the relationship among trainees’ perceived realism, usefulness and success. Also, trainers’ perception on 360-VR usefulness and success has been measured and compared with trainees. As the result of analysis indicated, trainees typically found the training sessions useful and perceived them to be successful; many felt that it was not really consistent with their real life experience. It would appear that perceived usefulness plays important role in forming the perception of success with high correlation and that the level of realism is not necessarily a deciding factor. Also, there was no significant difference between perceived usefulness and success between trainees and trainers. This research was conducted in collaboration with Mines Rescue Pty Ltd (a training provider for the coal mining industry in NSW, Australia) and was focused on training programs developed for mine rescue brigades. Data was collected from 94 mine rescue brigades (trainees) who attended a 360-VR training session over a twelvemonth period and 25 trainers who run the training sessions.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Pedram, S., Perez, P., Palmisano, S., & Farrelly, M. (2017). The application of simulation (Virtual Reality) for safety training in the context of mining industry. In Proceedings - 22nd International Congress on Modelling and Simulation, MODSIM 2017 (pp. 361-367).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85063933709

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 361

End Page


  • 367