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Fate of embryonic stem cells transplanted into the deafened mammalian cochlea

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), the primary afferent neurons of the cochlea, degenerate following a sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) due to lack of trophic support normally received from hair cells. Cell transplantation is emerging as a potential strategy for inner ear rehabilitation, as injected cells may be able to replace damaged SGNs in the deafened cochlea. An increase in the number of surviving SGNs may result in improved efficacy of cochlear implants (CIs). We examined the survival of partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (MESCs), following xenograft transplantation into the deafened guinea pig cochlea (n = 15). Cells were delivered directly into the left scala tympani via microinjection through the round window. Small numbers of MESCs were detected in the scala tympani for up to 4 weeks following transplantation and a proportion of these cells retained expression of neurofilament protein 68 kDa in vivo. While this delivery method requires refinement for effective long-term replacement of damaged SGNs, small numbers of MESCs were capable of survival in the deafened mammalian cochlea for up to 4 weeks, without causing an inflammatory tissue response. Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Coleman, B., Hardman, J., Coco, A., Epp, S., De Silva, M., Crook, J., & Shepherd, R. (2006). Fate of embryonic stem cells transplanted into the deafened mammalian cochlea. Cell Transplantation, 15(5), 369-380. doi:10.3727/000000006783981819

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33748251516

Start Page


  • 369

End Page


  • 380

Volume


  • 15

Issue


  • 5

Abstract


  • Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs), the primary afferent neurons of the cochlea, degenerate following a sensori-neural hearing loss (SNHL) due to lack of trophic support normally received from hair cells. Cell transplantation is emerging as a potential strategy for inner ear rehabilitation, as injected cells may be able to replace damaged SGNs in the deafened cochlea. An increase in the number of surviving SGNs may result in improved efficacy of cochlear implants (CIs). We examined the survival of partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (MESCs), following xenograft transplantation into the deafened guinea pig cochlea (n = 15). Cells were delivered directly into the left scala tympani via microinjection through the round window. Small numbers of MESCs were detected in the scala tympani for up to 4 weeks following transplantation and a proportion of these cells retained expression of neurofilament protein 68 kDa in vivo. While this delivery method requires refinement for effective long-term replacement of damaged SGNs, small numbers of MESCs were capable of survival in the deafened mammalian cochlea for up to 4 weeks, without causing an inflammatory tissue response. Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.

Publication Date


  • 2006

Citation


  • Coleman, B., Hardman, J., Coco, A., Epp, S., De Silva, M., Crook, J., & Shepherd, R. (2006). Fate of embryonic stem cells transplanted into the deafened mammalian cochlea. Cell Transplantation, 15(5), 369-380. doi:10.3727/000000006783981819

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33748251516

Start Page


  • 369

End Page


  • 380

Volume


  • 15

Issue


  • 5