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Hemodynamic traveling waves in human visual cortex

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Functional MRI (fMRI) experiments rely on precise characterization of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. As the spatial resolution of fMRI reaches the sub-millimeter range, the need for quantitative modelling of spatiotemporal properties of this hemodynamic signal has become pressing. Here, we find that a detailed physiologically-based model of spatiotemporal BOLD responses predicts traveling waves with velocities and spatial ranges in empirically observable ranges. Two measurable parameters, related to physiology, characterize these waves: wave velocity and damping rate. To test these predictions, high-resolution fMRI data are acquired from subjects viewing discrete visual stimuli. Predictions and experiment show strong agreement, in particular confirming BOLD waves propagating for at least 5-10 mm across the cortical surface at speeds of 2-12 mm s-1. These observations enable fundamentally new approaches to fMRI analysis, crucial for fMRI data acquired at high spatial resolution. © 2012 Aquino et al.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Aquino, K. M., Schira, M. M., Robinson, P. A., Drysdale, P. M., & Breakspear, M. (2012). Hemodynamic traveling waves in human visual cortex. PLoS Computational Biology, 8(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002435

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84861147148

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • Functional MRI (fMRI) experiments rely on precise characterization of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. As the spatial resolution of fMRI reaches the sub-millimeter range, the need for quantitative modelling of spatiotemporal properties of this hemodynamic signal has become pressing. Here, we find that a detailed physiologically-based model of spatiotemporal BOLD responses predicts traveling waves with velocities and spatial ranges in empirically observable ranges. Two measurable parameters, related to physiology, characterize these waves: wave velocity and damping rate. To test these predictions, high-resolution fMRI data are acquired from subjects viewing discrete visual stimuli. Predictions and experiment show strong agreement, in particular confirming BOLD waves propagating for at least 5-10 mm across the cortical surface at speeds of 2-12 mm s-1. These observations enable fundamentally new approaches to fMRI analysis, crucial for fMRI data acquired at high spatial resolution. © 2012 Aquino et al.

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Aquino, K. M., Schira, M. M., Robinson, P. A., Drysdale, P. M., & Breakspear, M. (2012). Hemodynamic traveling waves in human visual cortex. PLoS Computational Biology, 8(3). doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002435

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84861147148

Volume


  • 8

Issue


  • 3