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Might non-pharmacological treatment disadvantage patients with hypertension?

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Weight reduction, moderate salt restriction and alcohol reduction are effective in lowering blood pressure (BP), and are feasible interventions for long-term management of hypertension. When used in combination these non-pharmacological measures are significantly inferior to drug therapy in anti-hypertensive effect. When they are implemented as a first step in the treatment of mild hypertension, resorting to drug therapy only if non-pharmacological measures fail, anti-hypertensive drugs can be avoided in about 40% of patients. However, BP control is again significantly inferior with this strategy compared with drug therapy without non-pharmacological advice. Those given advice on non-pharmacological measures may therefore have suboptimal protection against cardiovascular complications. This is particularly so when the threshold for drug treatment is set at a DBP of ≥ 100 mm Hg, as many patients will be left untreated with DBPs between 90 and 99 mm Hg as a result of non-pharmacological measures. Non-pharmacological treatment may thus stand be tween patients and anti-hypertensive drug therapy, which nowadays is simple, well-tolerated, safe and proven effective in preventing cardiovascular disease. The role of non-pharmacological therapy needs to be reconsidered.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Ramsay, L. E., Haq, I. U., Yeo, W. W., & Jackson, P. R. (1995). Might non-pharmacological treatment disadvantage patients with hypertension?. In Journal of Human Hypertension Vol. 9 (pp. 653-657).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0029164461

Start Page


  • 653

End Page


  • 657

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 8

Abstract


  • Weight reduction, moderate salt restriction and alcohol reduction are effective in lowering blood pressure (BP), and are feasible interventions for long-term management of hypertension. When used in combination these non-pharmacological measures are significantly inferior to drug therapy in anti-hypertensive effect. When they are implemented as a first step in the treatment of mild hypertension, resorting to drug therapy only if non-pharmacological measures fail, anti-hypertensive drugs can be avoided in about 40% of patients. However, BP control is again significantly inferior with this strategy compared with drug therapy without non-pharmacological advice. Those given advice on non-pharmacological measures may therefore have suboptimal protection against cardiovascular complications. This is particularly so when the threshold for drug treatment is set at a DBP of ≥ 100 mm Hg, as many patients will be left untreated with DBPs between 90 and 99 mm Hg as a result of non-pharmacological measures. Non-pharmacological treatment may thus stand be tween patients and anti-hypertensive drug therapy, which nowadays is simple, well-tolerated, safe and proven effective in preventing cardiovascular disease. The role of non-pharmacological therapy needs to be reconsidered.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Ramsay, L. E., Haq, I. U., Yeo, W. W., & Jackson, P. R. (1995). Might non-pharmacological treatment disadvantage patients with hypertension?. In Journal of Human Hypertension Vol. 9 (pp. 653-657).

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0029164461

Start Page


  • 653

End Page


  • 657

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 8