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Prevalence of persistent cough during long-term enalapril treatment: Controlled study versus nifedipine

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The prevalence and severity of cough during long-term enalapril treatment were examined by comparing a cohort of 136 hypertensive patients who started treatment with enalapril with consecutive age and sex-matched patients who commenced nifedipine therapy during the same period.Cough and other symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire designed to avoid bias towards reporting cough.After a mean of 27 months’ treatment patients on enalapril had an excess of persistent cough (16 per cent, 95 per cent CI 7-25, p < 0.01), voice change (14 per cent, 95 per cent CI 2-27, p < 0.05) and sore throat (10 per cent, 95 per cent CI —0.1 to 20.3 per cent, p < 0.01) when compared to nifedipine-treated patients.The cough was usually dry, moderate or severe, paroxysmal, and troublesome at night.Cough tended to be more common in women (23 per cent vs.7.2 per cent), non-smokers, and at higher doses of enalapril, but was not related to age, duration of treatment, or chronic respiratory disease.Dry cough commonly persists as a troublesome side-effect during long-term enalapril treatment, and is often associated with voice change and sore throat. © 1991 Oxford University Press.

Publication Date


  • 1991

Published In


  • QJM  Journal

Citation


  • Yeo, W. W., Foster, G., & Ramsay, L. (1991). Prevalence of persistent cough during long-term enalapril treatment: Controlled study versus nifedipine. QJM, 80(3), 763-770. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.qjmed.a068625

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0025950044

Start Page


  • 763

End Page


  • 770

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • The prevalence and severity of cough during long-term enalapril treatment were examined by comparing a cohort of 136 hypertensive patients who started treatment with enalapril with consecutive age and sex-matched patients who commenced nifedipine therapy during the same period.Cough and other symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire designed to avoid bias towards reporting cough.After a mean of 27 months’ treatment patients on enalapril had an excess of persistent cough (16 per cent, 95 per cent CI 7-25, p < 0.01), voice change (14 per cent, 95 per cent CI 2-27, p < 0.05) and sore throat (10 per cent, 95 per cent CI —0.1 to 20.3 per cent, p < 0.01) when compared to nifedipine-treated patients.The cough was usually dry, moderate or severe, paroxysmal, and troublesome at night.Cough tended to be more common in women (23 per cent vs.7.2 per cent), non-smokers, and at higher doses of enalapril, but was not related to age, duration of treatment, or chronic respiratory disease.Dry cough commonly persists as a troublesome side-effect during long-term enalapril treatment, and is often associated with voice change and sore throat. © 1991 Oxford University Press.

Publication Date


  • 1991

Published In


  • QJM  Journal

Citation


  • Yeo, W. W., Foster, G., & Ramsay, L. (1991). Prevalence of persistent cough during long-term enalapril treatment: Controlled study versus nifedipine. QJM, 80(3), 763-770. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.qjmed.a068625

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0025950044

Start Page


  • 763

End Page


  • 770

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 3