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Comparison of formaldehyde tropospheric columns in Australia and New Zealand using MAX-DOAS, FTIR and TROPOMI

Journal Article


Abstract


  • South-eastern Australia has been identified by modelling studies as a hotspot of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; however, long-term observational VOC studies are lacking in this region. Here, 2.5 years of multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) formaldehyde (HCHO) measurements in Australasia are presented, from Broadmeadows, in northern Melbourne, Australia, and from Lauder, a rural site in the South Island of New Zealand. Across the measurement period from December 2016 to November 2019, the mean formaldehyde columns measured by the MAXDOAS were 2.50��0.61��1015 molec. cm-2 at Lauder and 5.40��1.59��1015 molec. cm-2 at Broadmeadows. In both locations, the seasonal cycle showed a pronounced peak in Austral summer (December-January-February) consistent with temperature-dependent formaldehyde production from biogenic precursor gases. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle was 0.7��1015 molec. cm-2 at Lauder, and it was 2.0�� 1015 molec. cm-2 at Broadmeadows. The Lauder MAXDOAS HCHO measurements are compared with 27 months of co-located Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations. The seasonal variation of Lauder MAX-DOAS HCHO, smoothed by the FTIR averaging kernels, showed good agreement with the FTIR measurements, with a linear regression slope of 1.03 and an R2 of 0.66 for monthly averaged formaldehyde partial columns (0-4 km). In addition to ground-based observations, a clear way to address the VOC measurement gap in areas such as Australasia is with satellite measurements. Here, we demonstrate that the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) can be used to distinguish formaldehyde hotspots in forested and agricultural regions of south-eastern Australia. The MAX-DOAS measurements are also compared to TROPOMI HCHO vertical columns at Lauder and Melbourne; very strong monthly average agreement is found for Melbourne (regression slope of 0.61 and R2 of 0.95) and a strong agreement is found at Lauder (regression slope of 0.73 and R2 of 0.61) for MAX-DOAS vs. TROPOMI between May 2018 and November 2019. This study, the first long-term satellite comparison study using MAX-DOAS in the Southern Hemisphere, highlights the improvement offered by TROPOMI's high resolution over previous satellite products and provides the groundwork for future studies using ground-based and satellite DOAS for studying VOCs in Australasia.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Ryan, R. G., Silver, J. D., Querel, R., Smale, D., Rhodes, S., Tully, M., . . . Schofield, R. (2020). Comparison of formaldehyde tropospheric columns in Australia and New Zealand using MAX-DOAS, FTIR and TROPOMI. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 13(12), 6501-6519. doi:10.5194/amt-13-6501-2020

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85097391474

Start Page


  • 6501

End Page


  • 6519

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • South-eastern Australia has been identified by modelling studies as a hotspot of biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; however, long-term observational VOC studies are lacking in this region. Here, 2.5 years of multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) formaldehyde (HCHO) measurements in Australasia are presented, from Broadmeadows, in northern Melbourne, Australia, and from Lauder, a rural site in the South Island of New Zealand. Across the measurement period from December 2016 to November 2019, the mean formaldehyde columns measured by the MAXDOAS were 2.50��0.61��1015 molec. cm-2 at Lauder and 5.40��1.59��1015 molec. cm-2 at Broadmeadows. In both locations, the seasonal cycle showed a pronounced peak in Austral summer (December-January-February) consistent with temperature-dependent formaldehyde production from biogenic precursor gases. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle was 0.7��1015 molec. cm-2 at Lauder, and it was 2.0�� 1015 molec. cm-2 at Broadmeadows. The Lauder MAXDOAS HCHO measurements are compared with 27 months of co-located Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations. The seasonal variation of Lauder MAX-DOAS HCHO, smoothed by the FTIR averaging kernels, showed good agreement with the FTIR measurements, with a linear regression slope of 1.03 and an R2 of 0.66 for monthly averaged formaldehyde partial columns (0-4 km). In addition to ground-based observations, a clear way to address the VOC measurement gap in areas such as Australasia is with satellite measurements. Here, we demonstrate that the TROPOspheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) can be used to distinguish formaldehyde hotspots in forested and agricultural regions of south-eastern Australia. The MAX-DOAS measurements are also compared to TROPOMI HCHO vertical columns at Lauder and Melbourne; very strong monthly average agreement is found for Melbourne (regression slope of 0.61 and R2 of 0.95) and a strong agreement is found at Lauder (regression slope of 0.73 and R2 of 0.61) for MAX-DOAS vs. TROPOMI between May 2018 and November 2019. This study, the first long-term satellite comparison study using MAX-DOAS in the Southern Hemisphere, highlights the improvement offered by TROPOMI's high resolution over previous satellite products and provides the groundwork for future studies using ground-based and satellite DOAS for studying VOCs in Australasia.

Publication Date


  • 2020

Citation


  • Ryan, R. G., Silver, J. D., Querel, R., Smale, D., Rhodes, S., Tully, M., . . . Schofield, R. (2020). Comparison of formaldehyde tropospheric columns in Australia and New Zealand using MAX-DOAS, FTIR and TROPOMI. Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 13(12), 6501-6519. doi:10.5194/amt-13-6501-2020

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85097391474

Start Page


  • 6501

End Page


  • 6519

Volume


  • 13

Issue


  • 12

Place Of Publication