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Global perspective jitter improves vection in central vision

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Purpose. Previous vection research has tended to avoid situations of visual-vcstihular conflict by studying the illusory self-motion induced by constant velocity radial or lamellar optic flow. However, in the real world these smoothly-changing, repetitive optic flow patterns are a rarity. Walking, running and even passive transportation usually produce global perspective jitter in the optic flow. The current study examined the effects of both global perspective jitter and visual-vestibular conflict on vection. Method. Experiments compared the vcction induced by jittering and nonjittering patterns of radially expanding optic flow. All displays simulated constant velocity forwards self-motion along the z-axis, with jitter (if present) occurring in the x-, y-, or x- and y-axes. At any point in time, the absolute amount of jitter was randomly selected from the display's jitter range (either 0-1/5, 0-1/4 or 0-1/3 of the simulated forwards displacement). This wa.s then altered according to perspective before it was applied to objects at different simulated locations in depth. Results. Contrary to the prevailing notion that visual-vestibular conflict impairs vection, jittering displays were found to produce more compelling illusions of self-motion than non-jittering displays. The medium jitter range (0-1/4) was found to produce the longest duration of vection. Conclusions. One possible explanation for these findings was that while subjects rapidly adapted to the jitter-free optic flow, the random nature of jittering displays reduced adaptation, resulting in little or no decline in vection over time. An alternative explanation was that displays with global perspective jitter were more ecologically valid than those without.

Publication Date


  • 1997

Citation


  • Palmisano, S., Gitlam, B., & Blackburn, S. (1997). Global perspective jitter improves vection in central vision. In Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Vol. 38.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33749097656

Volume


  • 38

Issue


  • 4

Abstract


  • Purpose. Previous vection research has tended to avoid situations of visual-vcstihular conflict by studying the illusory self-motion induced by constant velocity radial or lamellar optic flow. However, in the real world these smoothly-changing, repetitive optic flow patterns are a rarity. Walking, running and even passive transportation usually produce global perspective jitter in the optic flow. The current study examined the effects of both global perspective jitter and visual-vestibular conflict on vection. Method. Experiments compared the vcction induced by jittering and nonjittering patterns of radially expanding optic flow. All displays simulated constant velocity forwards self-motion along the z-axis, with jitter (if present) occurring in the x-, y-, or x- and y-axes. At any point in time, the absolute amount of jitter was randomly selected from the display's jitter range (either 0-1/5, 0-1/4 or 0-1/3 of the simulated forwards displacement). This wa.s then altered according to perspective before it was applied to objects at different simulated locations in depth. Results. Contrary to the prevailing notion that visual-vestibular conflict impairs vection, jittering displays were found to produce more compelling illusions of self-motion than non-jittering displays. The medium jitter range (0-1/4) was found to produce the longest duration of vection. Conclusions. One possible explanation for these findings was that while subjects rapidly adapted to the jitter-free optic flow, the random nature of jittering displays reduced adaptation, resulting in little or no decline in vection over time. An alternative explanation was that displays with global perspective jitter were more ecologically valid than those without.

Publication Date


  • 1997

Citation


  • Palmisano, S., Gitlam, B., & Blackburn, S. (1997). Global perspective jitter improves vection in central vision. In Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science Vol. 38.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-33749097656

Volume


  • 38

Issue


  • 4