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Occupational differences in computer-related anxiety: implications for the implementation of a computerized patient management information system

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The present investigation was concerned with the implementation of an information system within a health care setting. A large number of staff required training on a new patient management information system (MIS). The aim of this study was to assess occupational differences on a number of psychological variables associated with MIS success. Computer anxiety was of primary concern due to its relationship to avoidance of computers. A total of 175 questionnaires were distributed, with 103 questionnaires being completed and returned for analysis (61.1%). It was found that clerical/administrative staff had significantly higher self-efficacy regarding computer use and more experience with computers. The nursing group experienced significantly more, computer anxiety, negative attitudes, and negative expectations than the clerical group. Self-efficacy was found to be the best predictor of computer related anxiety. The results have implications for MIS implementation strategies particularly in the areas of training and resource allocation. © 1995 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Henderson, R. D., Deane, F. P., & Ward, M. J. (1995). Occupational differences in computer-related anxiety: implications for the implementation of a computerized patient management information system. Behaviour and Information Technology, 14(1), 23-31. doi:10.1080/01449299508914622

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84950649354

Start Page


  • 23

End Page


  • 31

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • The present investigation was concerned with the implementation of an information system within a health care setting. A large number of staff required training on a new patient management information system (MIS). The aim of this study was to assess occupational differences on a number of psychological variables associated with MIS success. Computer anxiety was of primary concern due to its relationship to avoidance of computers. A total of 175 questionnaires were distributed, with 103 questionnaires being completed and returned for analysis (61.1%). It was found that clerical/administrative staff had significantly higher self-efficacy regarding computer use and more experience with computers. The nursing group experienced significantly more, computer anxiety, negative attitudes, and negative expectations than the clerical group. Self-efficacy was found to be the best predictor of computer related anxiety. The results have implications for MIS implementation strategies particularly in the areas of training and resource allocation. © 1995 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Henderson, R. D., Deane, F. P., & Ward, M. J. (1995). Occupational differences in computer-related anxiety: implications for the implementation of a computerized patient management information system. Behaviour and Information Technology, 14(1), 23-31. doi:10.1080/01449299508914622

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84950649354

Start Page


  • 23

End Page


  • 31

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 1