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Sea-level history, 45,000 to 30,000 yr B.P., inferred from Benthic foraminifera, Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Surficial sediments of Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, are predominantly bioclastic, cool-temperate carbonates. Benthic foraminifera are abundant and distribution of species is closely related to water depth. For example, Massilina milletti is most common at depths ca. 40 m, while Discorbis dimidiatus is characteristics of shallow, subtidal environments. Elphidium crispum, a shallow-water species, and E. macelliforme, favoring deeper water, provide a useful numerical ratio. Their logarithmic relative abundance, in the sediment size fraction 0.50-0.25 mm, correlates strongly with water depth. Vibrocores SV 4 and SV 5 recovered undisturbed sections of Quaternary strata from the deepest part (ca. 40 m) of Gulf St. Vincent. Amino acid racemization and radiocarbon age determinations show that late Pleistocene sections of the cores were deposited over the time ca. 45,000 to 30,000 yr B.P. Species of fossil foraminifera, recovered from these sections, are mostly extant in modern Gulf St. Vincent, thus allowing paleoecological inferences of late Pleistocene sea levels. These inferred sea-level maxima can be correlated with those determined from study of Huon Peninsula coral reef terraces. Initial estimates of tectonically corrected sea levels for transgressions in Gulf St. Vincent at 40,000 and 31,000 yr B.P. are -22.5 m and -22 m, respectively. The intervening regression lowered sea level to -28 m. �� 1988.

Publication Date


  • 1988

Citation


  • Cann, J. H., Belperio, A. P., Gostin, V. A., & Murray-Wallace, C. V. (1988). Sea-level history, 45,000 to 30,000 yr B.P., inferred from Benthic foraminifera, Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia. Quaternary Research, 29(2), 153-175. doi:10.1016/0033-5894(88)90058-0

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0024229364

Start Page


  • 153

End Page


  • 175

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Surficial sediments of Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia, are predominantly bioclastic, cool-temperate carbonates. Benthic foraminifera are abundant and distribution of species is closely related to water depth. For example, Massilina milletti is most common at depths ca. 40 m, while Discorbis dimidiatus is characteristics of shallow, subtidal environments. Elphidium crispum, a shallow-water species, and E. macelliforme, favoring deeper water, provide a useful numerical ratio. Their logarithmic relative abundance, in the sediment size fraction 0.50-0.25 mm, correlates strongly with water depth. Vibrocores SV 4 and SV 5 recovered undisturbed sections of Quaternary strata from the deepest part (ca. 40 m) of Gulf St. Vincent. Amino acid racemization and radiocarbon age determinations show that late Pleistocene sections of the cores were deposited over the time ca. 45,000 to 30,000 yr B.P. Species of fossil foraminifera, recovered from these sections, are mostly extant in modern Gulf St. Vincent, thus allowing paleoecological inferences of late Pleistocene sea levels. These inferred sea-level maxima can be correlated with those determined from study of Huon Peninsula coral reef terraces. Initial estimates of tectonically corrected sea levels for transgressions in Gulf St. Vincent at 40,000 and 31,000 yr B.P. are -22.5 m and -22 m, respectively. The intervening regression lowered sea level to -28 m. �� 1988.

Publication Date


  • 1988

Citation


  • Cann, J. H., Belperio, A. P., Gostin, V. A., & Murray-Wallace, C. V. (1988). Sea-level history, 45,000 to 30,000 yr B.P., inferred from Benthic foraminifera, Gulf St. Vincent, South Australia. Quaternary Research, 29(2), 153-175. doi:10.1016/0033-5894(88)90058-0

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0024229364

Start Page


  • 153

End Page


  • 175

Volume


  • 29

Issue


  • 2

Place Of Publication