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Studies of a mangrove basin, Tuff Crater, New Zealand: I. Mangrove biomass and production of detritus

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The mangrove, Avicennia marina var. resinifera in a tidally-flooded explosion crater, Tuff Crater, near the southern latitudinal limit of mangroves in New Zealand adopts two distinct growth forms, taller tree-like mangroves up to 4 m tall along the banks of the tidal creek, and low stunted shrub mangroves less than 1 m tall on the mudflats. Twelve trees were felled and on the basis of a biomass/height relationship for the taller trees and a biomass/canopy width relationship for the lower, above-ground biomass (excluding pneumatophores) was estimated. Average above-ground biomass for the taller mangrove was estimated to be 104·1 t ha-1 and for the lower 6·8 t ha-1. While the value for the taller mangroves is similar to figures reported for more complex tropical mangroves, the fact that 94% of the basin is covered by low generally sparse mangroves means that total biomass for the basin is estimated to be 153 t, an average of only 7·6 t ha-1. Litter-fall beneath the taller mangroves is estimated as 7·6±2·5 t ha-1 a-1 and beneath the lower mangroves 3·3±0·5 t ha-1 a-1. The value for the taller mangroves is similar to that reported from mangroves in many other parts of the world, but because of the extensive low sparse mangroves the total for the basin is estimated as 53·7 t a-1, an average rate of 2·7 t ha-1 a-1, a very low rate of litter-fall when compared with elsewhere. Decomposition of mangrove leaves occurs relatively rapidly with leaves losing half their dry weight in 10 weeks and then continuing to degrade but at a slower rate. Substrate sediment samples contain high organic matter content, and although some organic matter appears to be exported via the tidal creek, a proportion of the detrital production is evidently recycled in situ. © 1985.

Publication Date


  • 1985

Citation


  • Woodroffe, C. D. (1985). Studies of a mangrove basin, Tuff Crater, New Zealand: I. Mangrove biomass and production of detritus. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 20(3), 265-280. doi:10.1016/0272-7714(85)90042-3

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0022203755

Start Page


  • 265

End Page


  • 280

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • The mangrove, Avicennia marina var. resinifera in a tidally-flooded explosion crater, Tuff Crater, near the southern latitudinal limit of mangroves in New Zealand adopts two distinct growth forms, taller tree-like mangroves up to 4 m tall along the banks of the tidal creek, and low stunted shrub mangroves less than 1 m tall on the mudflats. Twelve trees were felled and on the basis of a biomass/height relationship for the taller trees and a biomass/canopy width relationship for the lower, above-ground biomass (excluding pneumatophores) was estimated. Average above-ground biomass for the taller mangrove was estimated to be 104·1 t ha-1 and for the lower 6·8 t ha-1. While the value for the taller mangroves is similar to figures reported for more complex tropical mangroves, the fact that 94% of the basin is covered by low generally sparse mangroves means that total biomass for the basin is estimated to be 153 t, an average of only 7·6 t ha-1. Litter-fall beneath the taller mangroves is estimated as 7·6±2·5 t ha-1 a-1 and beneath the lower mangroves 3·3±0·5 t ha-1 a-1. The value for the taller mangroves is similar to that reported from mangroves in many other parts of the world, but because of the extensive low sparse mangroves the total for the basin is estimated as 53·7 t a-1, an average rate of 2·7 t ha-1 a-1, a very low rate of litter-fall when compared with elsewhere. Decomposition of mangrove leaves occurs relatively rapidly with leaves losing half their dry weight in 10 weeks and then continuing to degrade but at a slower rate. Substrate sediment samples contain high organic matter content, and although some organic matter appears to be exported via the tidal creek, a proportion of the detrital production is evidently recycled in situ. © 1985.

Publication Date


  • 1985

Citation


  • Woodroffe, C. D. (1985). Studies of a mangrove basin, Tuff Crater, New Zealand: I. Mangrove biomass and production of detritus. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 20(3), 265-280. doi:10.1016/0272-7714(85)90042-3

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0022203755

Start Page


  • 265

End Page


  • 280

Volume


  • 20

Issue


  • 3