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Pacific exploratory mission-tropics carbon monoxide measurements in historical context

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) over the southern Pacific during the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics (PEM-T) (August-October 1996) has been analyzed in comparison to other CO measurements. The following data sets have been used in the study: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory surface level sampling; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization aircraft measurements over Cape Grim, Tasmania; solar spectroscopic measurements at Lauder, New Zealand; and data from two spaceborne Measurement of Air Pollution From Satellite experiments. For the PEM-T mission back trajectories analysis and 3-D modeling of the CO transport have been performed. It has been demonstrated that CO measurements obtained by different in situ and remote techniques can be used to build the picture of the CO climatology over the large geographical area. The structure of the CO distribution over the western part of the southern Pacific during the austral spring is mainly controlled by emission from biomass burning in Australia and Africa and subsequent long-range transport. The prevailing westerly transport occurs in the middle and upper troposphere, whereas the marine boundary layer remains relatively clean and uniform. Barriers in the form of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and South Pacific Convergence Zone protect the equatorial area (equator to 10° S) from direct impact of biomass burning plumes from north and southwest. Consistency between the measurements taken in different years and modeling results indicates that the observed feature is a stable phenomenon. Outside the equatorial area the CO vertical distribution has a broad distinctive maximum at the altitude range 5-8 km and latitudes between 20° S and 30° S. This maximum is a stable feature, and its location indicates the area where the most intensive westerly transport occurs. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Pougatchev, N. S., Sachse, G. W., Fuelberg, H. E., Rinsland, C. P., Chatfield, R. B., Connors, V. S., . . . Reichle, H. G. (1999). Pacific exploratory mission-tropics carbon monoxide measurements in historical context. Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, 104(D21), 26195-26207. doi:10.1029/1999JD900465

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033589495

Start Page


  • 26195

End Page


  • 26207

Volume


  • 104

Issue


  • D21

Abstract


  • The three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) over the southern Pacific during the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics (PEM-T) (August-October 1996) has been analyzed in comparison to other CO measurements. The following data sets have been used in the study: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory surface level sampling; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization aircraft measurements over Cape Grim, Tasmania; solar spectroscopic measurements at Lauder, New Zealand; and data from two spaceborne Measurement of Air Pollution From Satellite experiments. For the PEM-T mission back trajectories analysis and 3-D modeling of the CO transport have been performed. It has been demonstrated that CO measurements obtained by different in situ and remote techniques can be used to build the picture of the CO climatology over the large geographical area. The structure of the CO distribution over the western part of the southern Pacific during the austral spring is mainly controlled by emission from biomass burning in Australia and Africa and subsequent long-range transport. The prevailing westerly transport occurs in the middle and upper troposphere, whereas the marine boundary layer remains relatively clean and uniform. Barriers in the form of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and South Pacific Convergence Zone protect the equatorial area (equator to 10° S) from direct impact of biomass burning plumes from north and southwest. Consistency between the measurements taken in different years and modeling results indicates that the observed feature is a stable phenomenon. Outside the equatorial area the CO vertical distribution has a broad distinctive maximum at the altitude range 5-8 km and latitudes between 20° S and 30° S. This maximum is a stable feature, and its location indicates the area where the most intensive westerly transport occurs. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Pougatchev, N. S., Sachse, G. W., Fuelberg, H. E., Rinsland, C. P., Chatfield, R. B., Connors, V. S., . . . Reichle, H. G. (1999). Pacific exploratory mission-tropics carbon monoxide measurements in historical context. Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, 104(D21), 26195-26207. doi:10.1029/1999JD900465

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033589495

Start Page


  • 26195

End Page


  • 26207

Volume


  • 104

Issue


  • D21