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Storage of X-ray photons in a crystal resonator

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The temporal structure and high brilliance of the X-ray beams produced by third-generation synchrotrons open up new possibilities in time-dependent diffraction and spectroscopy, where timescales down to the sub-nanosecond regime can now be accessed. These beam properties are such that one can envisage the development of the X-ray equivalent of optical components, such as photon delay lines and resonators, that have proved indispensable in a wide range of experiments-for example, pump-probe and multiple-interaction experiments-and (through shaping the temporal structure and repetition rate of the beams) time-dependent measurements in crystallography, physics, biology and chemistry. Optical resonators, such as those used in lasers, are available at wavelengths from the visible to soft X-rays. Equivalent components for hard X-rays have been discussed for more than thirty years, but have yet to be realized. Here we report the storage of hard X-ray photons (energy 15.817 keV) in a crystal resonator formed by two plates of crystalline silicon. The photons are stored for as many as 14 back-and-forth cycles within the resonator, each cycle separated by one nanosecond.

Publication Date


  • 2000

Published In


Citation


  • Liss, K. D., Hock, R., Gomm, M., Waibel, B., Magerl, A., Krisch, M., & Tucoulou, R. (2000). Storage of X-ray photons in a crystal resonator. Nature, 404(6776), 371-373. doi:10.1038/35006017

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0034704827

Start Page


  • 371

End Page


  • 373

Volume


  • 404

Issue


  • 6776

Abstract


  • The temporal structure and high brilliance of the X-ray beams produced by third-generation synchrotrons open up new possibilities in time-dependent diffraction and spectroscopy, where timescales down to the sub-nanosecond regime can now be accessed. These beam properties are such that one can envisage the development of the X-ray equivalent of optical components, such as photon delay lines and resonators, that have proved indispensable in a wide range of experiments-for example, pump-probe and multiple-interaction experiments-and (through shaping the temporal structure and repetition rate of the beams) time-dependent measurements in crystallography, physics, biology and chemistry. Optical resonators, such as those used in lasers, are available at wavelengths from the visible to soft X-rays. Equivalent components for hard X-rays have been discussed for more than thirty years, but have yet to be realized. Here we report the storage of hard X-ray photons (energy 15.817 keV) in a crystal resonator formed by two plates of crystalline silicon. The photons are stored for as many as 14 back-and-forth cycles within the resonator, each cycle separated by one nanosecond.

Publication Date


  • 2000

Published In


Citation


  • Liss, K. D., Hock, R., Gomm, M., Waibel, B., Magerl, A., Krisch, M., & Tucoulou, R. (2000). Storage of X-ray photons in a crystal resonator. Nature, 404(6776), 371-373. doi:10.1038/35006017

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0034704827

Start Page


  • 371

End Page


  • 373

Volume


  • 404

Issue


  • 6776