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Selection of substrata by juvenile Choromytilus chorus (Mytilidae): are chemical cues important?

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The importance of filamentous algae, and filamentous structures in general, to patterns of recruitment in mytilids is well documented. Surprisingly, the relative importance of physical and chemical cues in mediating this interaction has rarely been examined for mytilid larvae or plantigrades. Here we examine the distribution and abundance of three mytilid species on three common species of algae on the mid to low intertidal zone of southern Chile and then test the responses of plantigrades of one of these mytilid species to extracts from the surface of these algae and from conspecifics. We found that mytilids were always associated with the robust filamentous red alga Gymnogongrus furcellatus, but were present on less than 30% of the fronds of Iridaea laminarioides and Ulva rigida. In addition, average densities of mytilids on G. furcellatus exceeded 500 individuals per frond, more than an order of magnitude higher than on the other algal species. This alga forms an important refuge from gastropod predation for one of the mytilids examined, Choromytilus chorus (Molina), which only recruits successfully to the rocky substratum in the presence of this alga. In laboratory trials, we tested the response of juvenile (< 30 mm) C. chorus to surface extracts from three species of algae which co-occur with this mytilid and extracts from the byssal threads and periostracum of conspecifics. We predicted that juveniles of this mytilid would show a strong preference for extract from G. furcellatus. Surprisingly, extract from this alga was the only extract rejected by these juvenile mussels; they produced significantly fewer byssal threads in response to treatments as compared to controls. We found no evidence that juveniles of C. chorus are responding to positive cues, but they emphatically rejected a negative cue (antifouling paint). We concluded that chemical cues are unlikely to be important in the formation of aggregations of C. chorus. © 1995.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Davis, A. R., & Moreno, C. A. (1995). Selection of substrata by juvenile Choromytilus chorus (Mytilidae): are chemical cues important?. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 191(2), 167-180. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(95)00049-W

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028982910

Start Page


  • 167

End Page


  • 180

Volume


  • 191

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • The importance of filamentous algae, and filamentous structures in general, to patterns of recruitment in mytilids is well documented. Surprisingly, the relative importance of physical and chemical cues in mediating this interaction has rarely been examined for mytilid larvae or plantigrades. Here we examine the distribution and abundance of three mytilid species on three common species of algae on the mid to low intertidal zone of southern Chile and then test the responses of plantigrades of one of these mytilid species to extracts from the surface of these algae and from conspecifics. We found that mytilids were always associated with the robust filamentous red alga Gymnogongrus furcellatus, but were present on less than 30% of the fronds of Iridaea laminarioides and Ulva rigida. In addition, average densities of mytilids on G. furcellatus exceeded 500 individuals per frond, more than an order of magnitude higher than on the other algal species. This alga forms an important refuge from gastropod predation for one of the mytilids examined, Choromytilus chorus (Molina), which only recruits successfully to the rocky substratum in the presence of this alga. In laboratory trials, we tested the response of juvenile (< 30 mm) C. chorus to surface extracts from three species of algae which co-occur with this mytilid and extracts from the byssal threads and periostracum of conspecifics. We predicted that juveniles of this mytilid would show a strong preference for extract from G. furcellatus. Surprisingly, extract from this alga was the only extract rejected by these juvenile mussels; they produced significantly fewer byssal threads in response to treatments as compared to controls. We found no evidence that juveniles of C. chorus are responding to positive cues, but they emphatically rejected a negative cue (antifouling paint). We concluded that chemical cues are unlikely to be important in the formation of aggregations of C. chorus. © 1995.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Davis, A. R., & Moreno, C. A. (1995). Selection of substrata by juvenile Choromytilus chorus (Mytilidae): are chemical cues important?. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 191(2), 167-180. doi:10.1016/0022-0981(95)00049-W

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0028982910

Start Page


  • 167

End Page


  • 180

Volume


  • 191

Issue


  • 2