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Spatial variability in species composition in birds and insects

Journal Article


Abstract


  • If spatial patterns of change within a habitat were similar for both vertebrates and insects, then vertebrates would provide useful surrogates for designing reserves for the conservation of invertebrates. Data from two eucalypt habitats were analysed to determine levels of habitat richness, site richness and species turnover in birds and insects. For birds the relatively low species richness and turnover indicated that sites within the habitat were similar in composition. In wet eucalypt forests Diptera were very speciose with over 1,000 morphospeices sorted. Species turnover was slightly higher than for birds, indicating a large number of species change from site to site. In dry eucalypt woodland, insects trapped through the winter months were not speciose but turnover between sites was very large. This suggests reserves designed to conserve insects may need to be larger than for birds in order to include the high site variability and richness of insect communities. Spatial patterns of birds and insects were investigated further, to determine if sites that were closer together were more similar for both birds and insects. No patterns were found for birds in either habitat suggesting birds are not responding to changes in the environment at this scale. Diptera in wet eucalypt forest showed higher similarity between close sites than distant sites, while for winter insects in dry eucalypt woodland the relationship was significant when two outlier points were removed. Overall, birds are not good surrogates for insects in either habitat as no relationship between birds and insects in site-to-site similarity was found.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • French, K. (1999). Spatial variability in species composition in birds and insects. Journal of Insect Conservation, 3(3), 183-189. doi:10.1023/A:1009691510943

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033404286

Start Page


  • 183

End Page


  • 189

Volume


  • 3

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • If spatial patterns of change within a habitat were similar for both vertebrates and insects, then vertebrates would provide useful surrogates for designing reserves for the conservation of invertebrates. Data from two eucalypt habitats were analysed to determine levels of habitat richness, site richness and species turnover in birds and insects. For birds the relatively low species richness and turnover indicated that sites within the habitat were similar in composition. In wet eucalypt forests Diptera were very speciose with over 1,000 morphospeices sorted. Species turnover was slightly higher than for birds, indicating a large number of species change from site to site. In dry eucalypt woodland, insects trapped through the winter months were not speciose but turnover between sites was very large. This suggests reserves designed to conserve insects may need to be larger than for birds in order to include the high site variability and richness of insect communities. Spatial patterns of birds and insects were investigated further, to determine if sites that were closer together were more similar for both birds and insects. No patterns were found for birds in either habitat suggesting birds are not responding to changes in the environment at this scale. Diptera in wet eucalypt forest showed higher similarity between close sites than distant sites, while for winter insects in dry eucalypt woodland the relationship was significant when two outlier points were removed. Overall, birds are not good surrogates for insects in either habitat as no relationship between birds and insects in site-to-site similarity was found.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • French, K. (1999). Spatial variability in species composition in birds and insects. Journal of Insect Conservation, 3(3), 183-189. doi:10.1023/A:1009691510943

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0033404286

Start Page


  • 183

End Page


  • 189

Volume


  • 3

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication