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Executive access to information systems in Australian public organizations

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Senior executives in all organizations require information for strategic decision making and are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of the quality of their information systems. There is a continual increase in the numbers of executives who are directly accessing computerized information, however, when they do, there are significant consequences throughout the organization. Information systems personnel are often sceptical of the value of executive use of information technology and fear that increased managerial scrutiny may highlight flaws and deficiencies in 'their' systems. Managers of functional production and support units, who see themselves as 'owners' of data in systems under their control, are disturbed by the prospect that executives will have on-line access to organizational data. This paper reports the findings of a multiple case study of executive information systems, and executive computer use, in medium-sized Australian public organizations. As top management becomes more directly involved in the organization's information systems, problems with the information flow aroung the organization are highlighted. At the same time the opportunity arises to improve the alignment of the organization's information systems with strategic organizational goals. Management must then decide who should be responsible for the content and delivery of computer based information for strategic control and decision making. �� 1995.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Hasan, H., & Lampitsi, S. (1995). Executive access to information systems in Australian public organizations. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 4(3), 213-223. doi:10.1016/0963-8687(95)96802-F

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0010795077

Start Page


  • 213

End Page


  • 223

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Senior executives in all organizations require information for strategic decision making and are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of the quality of their information systems. There is a continual increase in the numbers of executives who are directly accessing computerized information, however, when they do, there are significant consequences throughout the organization. Information systems personnel are often sceptical of the value of executive use of information technology and fear that increased managerial scrutiny may highlight flaws and deficiencies in 'their' systems. Managers of functional production and support units, who see themselves as 'owners' of data in systems under their control, are disturbed by the prospect that executives will have on-line access to organizational data. This paper reports the findings of a multiple case study of executive information systems, and executive computer use, in medium-sized Australian public organizations. As top management becomes more directly involved in the organization's information systems, problems with the information flow aroung the organization are highlighted. At the same time the opportunity arises to improve the alignment of the organization's information systems with strategic organizational goals. Management must then decide who should be responsible for the content and delivery of computer based information for strategic control and decision making. �� 1995.

Publication Date


  • 1995

Citation


  • Hasan, H., & Lampitsi, S. (1995). Executive access to information systems in Australian public organizations. Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 4(3), 213-223. doi:10.1016/0963-8687(95)96802-F

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0010795077

Start Page


  • 213

End Page


  • 223

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication