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Visual perception of action categories and the "bowl-throw" decision in cricket

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Cricket umpires, cricket bowlers, and physical education students (who were knowledgeable about the rules of cricket), were shown 72 videotaped point-light displays of cricket deliveries with varying extents of elbow flexion such that they ranged from highly "bowl-like" to highly "throw-like". The observers made a bowl-throw decision about each display, and the umpires and bowlers reported their confidence on a 5-point scale. The percentage of displays reported as a "bowl" was 59, 40, and 44 for the umpires, bowlers, and students respectively. Umpires made significantly more bowl decisions than both the bowlers and students, but there was no difference between the latter groups. Umpires were significantly more confident than the bowlers in both their bowl and throw decisions. Thus, in an experimental setting, with no apparent costs or benefits associated with their decision-making, umpires "called" a bowler significantly less frequently for throwing than other knowledgeable observers. The procedures devised for this experiment demonstrate that psychophysical methods can be applied to the problem of discrete action-category nominations in sport (e.g., bowl or throw, walk or run).

Publication Date


  • 2001

Citation


  • Sparrow, W. A., Shemmell, J., & Shinkfield, A. J. (2001). Visual perception of action categories and the "bowl-throw" decision in cricket. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 4(2), 233-244. doi:10.1016/S1440-2440(01)80033-5

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0034918541

Start Page


  • 233

End Page


  • 244

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 2

Abstract


  • Cricket umpires, cricket bowlers, and physical education students (who were knowledgeable about the rules of cricket), were shown 72 videotaped point-light displays of cricket deliveries with varying extents of elbow flexion such that they ranged from highly "bowl-like" to highly "throw-like". The observers made a bowl-throw decision about each display, and the umpires and bowlers reported their confidence on a 5-point scale. The percentage of displays reported as a "bowl" was 59, 40, and 44 for the umpires, bowlers, and students respectively. Umpires made significantly more bowl decisions than both the bowlers and students, but there was no difference between the latter groups. Umpires were significantly more confident than the bowlers in both their bowl and throw decisions. Thus, in an experimental setting, with no apparent costs or benefits associated with their decision-making, umpires "called" a bowler significantly less frequently for throwing than other knowledgeable observers. The procedures devised for this experiment demonstrate that psychophysical methods can be applied to the problem of discrete action-category nominations in sport (e.g., bowl or throw, walk or run).

Publication Date


  • 2001

Citation


  • Sparrow, W. A., Shemmell, J., & Shinkfield, A. J. (2001). Visual perception of action categories and the "bowl-throw" decision in cricket. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 4(2), 233-244. doi:10.1016/S1440-2440(01)80033-5

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0034918541

Start Page


  • 233

End Page


  • 244

Volume


  • 4

Issue


  • 2