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Multifunctional Superelastic Foam-Like Boron Nitride Nanotubular Cellular-Network Architectures

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Construction of cellular architectures has been expected to enhance materials' mechanical tolerance and to stimulate and broaden their efficient utilizations in many potential fields. However, hitherto, there have been rather scarce developments in boron nitride (BN)-type cellular architectures because of well-known difficulties in the syntheses of BN-based structures. Herein, cellular-network multifunctional foams made of interconnective nanotubular hexagonal BN (h-BN) architectures are developed using carbothermal reduction-assisted in situ chemical vapor deposition conversion from N-doped tubular graphitic cellular foams. These ultralight, chemically inert, thermally stable, and robust-integrity (supporting about 25,000 times of their own weight) three-dimensional-BN foams exhibit a 98.5% porosity, remarkable shape recovery (even after cycling compressions with 90% deformations), excellent resistance to water intrusion, thermal diffusion stability, and high strength and stiffness. They remarkably reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion and dielectric constant of polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) composites, greatly contribute to their thermal conductivity improvement, and effectively limit polymeric composite softening at elevated temperatures. The foams also demonstrate high-capacity adsorption-separation and removal ability for a wide range of oils and organic chemicals in oil/water systems and reliable recovery under their cycling usage as organic adsorbers. These created multifunctional foams should be valuable in many high-end practical applications.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Xue, Y., Dai, P., Zhou, M., Wang, X., Pakdel, A., Zhang, C., . . . Golberg, D. (2017). Multifunctional Superelastic Foam-Like Boron Nitride Nanotubular Cellular-Network Architectures. ACS Nano, 11(1), 558-568. doi:10.1021/acsnano.6b06601

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85018517354

Start Page


  • 558

End Page


  • 568

Volume


  • 11

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


Abstract


  • Construction of cellular architectures has been expected to enhance materials' mechanical tolerance and to stimulate and broaden their efficient utilizations in many potential fields. However, hitherto, there have been rather scarce developments in boron nitride (BN)-type cellular architectures because of well-known difficulties in the syntheses of BN-based structures. Herein, cellular-network multifunctional foams made of interconnective nanotubular hexagonal BN (h-BN) architectures are developed using carbothermal reduction-assisted in situ chemical vapor deposition conversion from N-doped tubular graphitic cellular foams. These ultralight, chemically inert, thermally stable, and robust-integrity (supporting about 25,000 times of their own weight) three-dimensional-BN foams exhibit a 98.5% porosity, remarkable shape recovery (even after cycling compressions with 90% deformations), excellent resistance to water intrusion, thermal diffusion stability, and high strength and stiffness. They remarkably reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion and dielectric constant of polymeric poly(methyl methacrylate) composites, greatly contribute to their thermal conductivity improvement, and effectively limit polymeric composite softening at elevated temperatures. The foams also demonstrate high-capacity adsorption-separation and removal ability for a wide range of oils and organic chemicals in oil/water systems and reliable recovery under their cycling usage as organic adsorbers. These created multifunctional foams should be valuable in many high-end practical applications.

Publication Date


  • 2017

Citation


  • Xue, Y., Dai, P., Zhou, M., Wang, X., Pakdel, A., Zhang, C., . . . Golberg, D. (2017). Multifunctional Superelastic Foam-Like Boron Nitride Nanotubular Cellular-Network Architectures. ACS Nano, 11(1), 558-568. doi:10.1021/acsnano.6b06601

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-85018517354

Start Page


  • 558

End Page


  • 568

Volume


  • 11

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication