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A kinetic analysis of footfall patterns at landing in netball

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The purpose of this paper was to examine differences in the ground reaction forces generated by subjects who landed on the heel (n = 3) compared to subjects who landed on the forefoot (n = 7) during a standard netball task. Kinetic data were obtained for 10 skilled netball players (mean age = 21.5 years) performing a typical attacking netball movement pattern and receiving a high, straight pass. Force-time histories of the maximum peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), the initial peak VGRF, and peak braking forces were determined for each trial. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that subjects who landed on the forefoot demonstrated the following characteristics: significantly lower initial peak VGRF and significantly lower braking forces compared to subjects who landed on the heel. It was concluded that the inclusion of an additional lower extremity segment (the foot) in the movement pattern at the point of foot ground contact resulted in greater dampening of the landing forces and a reduced potential for injury.

Publication Date


  • 1989

Citation


  • Steele, J. R., & Milburn, P. D. (1989). A kinetic analysis of footfall patterns at landing in netball. Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21(1), 10-13.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0024390204

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 10

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 1

Abstract


  • The purpose of this paper was to examine differences in the ground reaction forces generated by subjects who landed on the heel (n = 3) compared to subjects who landed on the forefoot (n = 7) during a standard netball task. Kinetic data were obtained for 10 skilled netball players (mean age = 21.5 years) performing a typical attacking netball movement pattern and receiving a high, straight pass. Force-time histories of the maximum peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF), the initial peak VGRF, and peak braking forces were determined for each trial. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that subjects who landed on the forefoot demonstrated the following characteristics: significantly lower initial peak VGRF and significantly lower braking forces compared to subjects who landed on the heel. It was concluded that the inclusion of an additional lower extremity segment (the foot) in the movement pattern at the point of foot ground contact resulted in greater dampening of the landing forces and a reduced potential for injury.

Publication Date


  • 1989

Citation


  • Steele, J. R., & Milburn, P. D. (1989). A kinetic analysis of footfall patterns at landing in netball. Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 21(1), 10-13.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0024390204

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 10

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 21

Issue


  • 1