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Ejector chairs: Do they work and are they safe?

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The purpose of the present study was to gain a better understanding of the influence of an ejector chair in assisting patients to rise and stand from a seated position. Patients in the Illawarra area who had been prescribed ejector chairs for use in their homes were surveyed and two-dimensional kinematic analyses of nine patients rising from their chairs, with and without the ejector mechanism working, were conducted. Results showed that, when rising with the ejector mechanism operating, subjects tended to require less time to rise and less trunk flexion compared with rising without the ejector mechanism operating. However, the kinematic analyses did not provide evidence of the ejector mechanism destabilizing subjects on rising to stand. It was concluded that appropriate prescription, adequate training in chair usage and follow up of chair settings are required to ensure patients optimize benefits and minimize the risk of falls associated with ejector chair use.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Bashford, G. M., Steele, J. R., Munro, B. J., Westcott, G., & Jones, M. E. (1998). Ejector chairs: Do they work and are they safe?. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 45(3), 99-106. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.1998.tb00790.x

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0031757482

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 99

End Page


  • 106

Volume


  • 45

Issue


  • 3

Abstract


  • The purpose of the present study was to gain a better understanding of the influence of an ejector chair in assisting patients to rise and stand from a seated position. Patients in the Illawarra area who had been prescribed ejector chairs for use in their homes were surveyed and two-dimensional kinematic analyses of nine patients rising from their chairs, with and without the ejector mechanism working, were conducted. Results showed that, when rising with the ejector mechanism operating, subjects tended to require less time to rise and less trunk flexion compared with rising without the ejector mechanism operating. However, the kinematic analyses did not provide evidence of the ejector mechanism destabilizing subjects on rising to stand. It was concluded that appropriate prescription, adequate training in chair usage and follow up of chair settings are required to ensure patients optimize benefits and minimize the risk of falls associated with ejector chair use.

Publication Date


  • 1998

Citation


  • Bashford, G. M., Steele, J. R., Munro, B. J., Westcott, G., & Jones, M. E. (1998). Ejector chairs: Do they work and are they safe?. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 45(3), 99-106. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1630.1998.tb00790.x

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0031757482

Web Of Science Accession Number


Start Page


  • 99

End Page


  • 106

Volume


  • 45

Issue


  • 3