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Warm-up effect on active and passive arthrometric assessment of knee laxity

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Objective: To determine the influence of a warm-up protocol suitable for use in clinical settings on tibial displacement and muscle activity during arthrometric knee laxity assessment. Design: Intervention study in which the subjects served as their own controls. Setting: The Biomechanics Research Laboratory, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Subjects: Ten volunteers who reported no history of knee trauma or disease. Intervention: A warm-up consisting of 10 minutes of ergometer cycling (60rpm) followed by two sets of three hamstring muscle stretches. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were: (1) anterior tibial translation and knee extension force assessed using a Dynamic Cruciate Tester(®) for each subject's right knee during active and passive testing, and (2) intensity of quadriceps and hamstring muscle activity during knee laxity testing. Results: There was significantly less quadriceps activity after warm-up (t = 2.419, p = .039). However, there was no significant difference between anterior tibial translation, knee extension force, or hamstring muscle activity results before and after warm-up in either active or passive tests. Conclusion: A warm-up suitable for use in a clinical setting is not required before arthrometric assessment of knee laxity.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Steele, J. R., Milburn, P. D., & Roger, G. J. (1999). Warm-up effect on active and passive arthrometric assessment of knee laxity. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 80(7), 829-836. doi:10.1016/S0003-9993(99)90235-6

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0032990426

Start Page


  • 829

End Page


  • 836

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 7

Abstract


  • Objective: To determine the influence of a warm-up protocol suitable for use in clinical settings on tibial displacement and muscle activity during arthrometric knee laxity assessment. Design: Intervention study in which the subjects served as their own controls. Setting: The Biomechanics Research Laboratory, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Subjects: Ten volunteers who reported no history of knee trauma or disease. Intervention: A warm-up consisting of 10 minutes of ergometer cycling (60rpm) followed by two sets of three hamstring muscle stretches. Main Outcome Measures: Outcome measures were: (1) anterior tibial translation and knee extension force assessed using a Dynamic Cruciate Tester(®) for each subject's right knee during active and passive testing, and (2) intensity of quadriceps and hamstring muscle activity during knee laxity testing. Results: There was significantly less quadriceps activity after warm-up (t = 2.419, p = .039). However, there was no significant difference between anterior tibial translation, knee extension force, or hamstring muscle activity results before and after warm-up in either active or passive tests. Conclusion: A warm-up suitable for use in a clinical setting is not required before arthrometric assessment of knee laxity.

Publication Date


  • 1999

Citation


  • Steele, J. R., Milburn, P. D., & Roger, G. J. (1999). Warm-up effect on active and passive arthrometric assessment of knee laxity. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 80(7), 829-836. doi:10.1016/S0003-9993(99)90235-6

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-0032990426

Start Page


  • 829

End Page


  • 836

Volume


  • 80

Issue


  • 7