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Effectiveness of alcohol media literacy programmes: a systematic literature review

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Alcohol media literacy is an emerging field that aims to address the link between exposure to alcohol advertising and subsequent expectancies and behaviours for children and adolescents. The design, rigour and results of alcohol media literacy programmes vary considerably, resulting in a number of unanswered questions about effectiveness. To provide insight into some of these questions, a systematic literature review of alcohol media literacy studies was conducted. The review was guided by the following research question: What considerations are needed to develop an effective school-based alcohol media literacy programme? On the basis of a critical synthesis of 10 interventions (published in the period 1997 to May 2014), our findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the descriptive, methodological and outcome characteristics of this small body of significant research. The review provides considerations for future alcohol media literacy programmes, including the need for an interactive pedagogical approach within the naturalistic school setting, implementation fidelity and a holistic approach to programme evaluation, a means for maintaining relevance, consideration of gender differences, relevance for an international audience and use of follow-up and longitudinal data.

Authors


  •   Gordon, Chloe (external author)
  •   Jones, Sandra C. (external author)
  •   Kervin, Lisa K.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Gordon, C. S., Jones, S. C. & Kervin, L. (2015). Effectiveness of alcohol media literacy programmes: a systematic literature review. Health Education Research, 30 (3), 449-465.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84930442813

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2853&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1854

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 449

End Page


  • 465

Volume


  • 30

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Alcohol media literacy is an emerging field that aims to address the link between exposure to alcohol advertising and subsequent expectancies and behaviours for children and adolescents. The design, rigour and results of alcohol media literacy programmes vary considerably, resulting in a number of unanswered questions about effectiveness. To provide insight into some of these questions, a systematic literature review of alcohol media literacy studies was conducted. The review was guided by the following research question: What considerations are needed to develop an effective school-based alcohol media literacy programme? On the basis of a critical synthesis of 10 interventions (published in the period 1997 to May 2014), our findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the descriptive, methodological and outcome characteristics of this small body of significant research. The review provides considerations for future alcohol media literacy programmes, including the need for an interactive pedagogical approach within the naturalistic school setting, implementation fidelity and a holistic approach to programme evaluation, a means for maintaining relevance, consideration of gender differences, relevance for an international audience and use of follow-up and longitudinal data.

Authors


  •   Gordon, Chloe (external author)
  •   Jones, Sandra C. (external author)
  •   Kervin, Lisa K.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Gordon, C. S., Jones, S. C. & Kervin, L. (2015). Effectiveness of alcohol media literacy programmes: a systematic literature review. Health Education Research, 30 (3), 449-465.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84930442813

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2853&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1854

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 16

Start Page


  • 449

End Page


  • 465

Volume


  • 30

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom