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Privacy-preserving encryption scheme using DNA parentage test

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Consider the following practical scenario. Amother Alice would like to make her assets accessible only to her descen-dents. In order to do so, she encrypts her secret Swiss bank account with her DNA sequences, and provides this information to her descendents. To simplify the scenario and without losing generality, we assume that Alice has only one son, named Bob. Therefore, Alice provides the ciphertext to her family (this ciphertext can eventually be published), which will later be stored in a secure cloud storage. Later, when Alice is unable to access her assets herself (due to her illness for instance), then she can ask Bob to use his DNA to conduct a successful decryption. The decryption is successful if and only if Bob is a true descendent of Alice (i.e., Bob passes the DNA parentage test). Furthermore, a third party Charlie will not be able to conduct a successful decryption, even if he colludes with other people who are not Alice’s relatives, since Charlie does not have the required DNA sequences, and hence, he will fail the DNA parentage test. Additionally, Charlie will not learn about anything else other than the unsuccessful decryption process.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Gritti, C., Susilo, W., Plantard, T. & Win, K. (2015). Privacy-preserving encryption scheme using DNA parentage test. Theoretical Computer Science, 580 1-13.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84951749012

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5130&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/4109

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 580

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands

Abstract


  • Consider the following practical scenario. Amother Alice would like to make her assets accessible only to her descen-dents. In order to do so, she encrypts her secret Swiss bank account with her DNA sequences, and provides this information to her descendents. To simplify the scenario and without losing generality, we assume that Alice has only one son, named Bob. Therefore, Alice provides the ciphertext to her family (this ciphertext can eventually be published), which will later be stored in a secure cloud storage. Later, when Alice is unable to access her assets herself (due to her illness for instance), then she can ask Bob to use his DNA to conduct a successful decryption. The decryption is successful if and only if Bob is a true descendent of Alice (i.e., Bob passes the DNA parentage test). Furthermore, a third party Charlie will not be able to conduct a successful decryption, even if he colludes with other people who are not Alice’s relatives, since Charlie does not have the required DNA sequences, and hence, he will fail the DNA parentage test. Additionally, Charlie will not learn about anything else other than the unsuccessful decryption process.

Publication Date


  • 2015

Citation


  • Gritti, C., Susilo, W., Plantard, T. & Win, K. (2015). Privacy-preserving encryption scheme using DNA parentage test. Theoretical Computer Science, 580 1-13.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84951749012

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=5130&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/4109

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 12

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 13

Volume


  • 580

Place Of Publication


  • Netherlands