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The Marketing/R&D Interface during the New Product Development Process (NPDP): A Re-Conceptualisation

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Marketing's cross-functional relationships (CFRs) have received increasing attention from

    researchers (Hutt 1995, Fisher, Maltz and Jaworski 1997, Workman, Homburg and Gruner

    1998, Song, Xie and Dyer 2000, Dawes and Massey 2000). Webster (1997) has suggested

    that the ability to manage relationships - both internal (cross-functional) and external

    (strategic partners) will be a necessary skill for marketing managers in the future. It is the

    contention of this thesis that nowhere is this ability to effectively manage cross-functional

    working relationships between participants more important than in the new product

    development process (NPDP) of organizations. Unfortunately, empirical evidence suggests

    that this key corporate activity is very problematic in nature with the ultimate result often

    being unsuccessful new products and extremely poor relations between cross-functional

    participants (Souder 1981, 1988). This paper aims to develop a better understanding of the

    antecedents and consequences of collaborative cross-functional working relationships

    between the two main decision actors in the process, the marketing manager and the R&D

    manager. Specifically, this paper attempts to add to and refine the extant knowledge

    regarding the vital marketing an technical (e.g., R&D, engineering) cross-functional

    working relationship (CFR) from a socio-psychological perspective by better integrating the

    concepts of interpersonal trust and collaboration into a new conceptualisation of the CFR

    between the two key functional decision makers.

Publication Date


  • 2003

Citation


  • Kyriazis, E. (2003). The Marketing/R&D Interface during the New Product Development Process (NPDP): A Re-Conceptualisation. In R. Kennedy (Eds.), Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (pp. 486-501). Adelaide, Australia: Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy.

Start Page


  • 486

End Page


  • 501

Place Of Publication


  • Adelaide, Australia

Abstract


  • Marketing's cross-functional relationships (CFRs) have received increasing attention from

    researchers (Hutt 1995, Fisher, Maltz and Jaworski 1997, Workman, Homburg and Gruner

    1998, Song, Xie and Dyer 2000, Dawes and Massey 2000). Webster (1997) has suggested

    that the ability to manage relationships - both internal (cross-functional) and external

    (strategic partners) will be a necessary skill for marketing managers in the future. It is the

    contention of this thesis that nowhere is this ability to effectively manage cross-functional

    working relationships between participants more important than in the new product

    development process (NPDP) of organizations. Unfortunately, empirical evidence suggests

    that this key corporate activity is very problematic in nature with the ultimate result often

    being unsuccessful new products and extremely poor relations between cross-functional

    participants (Souder 1981, 1988). This paper aims to develop a better understanding of the

    antecedents and consequences of collaborative cross-functional working relationships

    between the two main decision actors in the process, the marketing manager and the R&D

    manager. Specifically, this paper attempts to add to and refine the extant knowledge

    regarding the vital marketing an technical (e.g., R&D, engineering) cross-functional

    working relationship (CFR) from a socio-psychological perspective by better integrating the

    concepts of interpersonal trust and collaboration into a new conceptualisation of the CFR

    between the two key functional decision makers.

Publication Date


  • 2003

Citation


  • Kyriazis, E. (2003). The Marketing/R&D Interface during the New Product Development Process (NPDP): A Re-Conceptualisation. In R. Kennedy (Eds.), Proceedings of the Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference (pp. 486-501). Adelaide, Australia: Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy.

Start Page


  • 486

End Page


  • 501

Place Of Publication


  • Adelaide, Australia