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Epilogue: Indigenising transnationalism? Challenges for new imperial and cosmopolitan histories

Chapter


Abstract


  • Writing in 1938, Te Rangihiroa, Maori anthropologist and director of the Bishop Museum in Hawaii, reached out to his 'kinsmen' across the Pacific in the hope they would join together through their bonds of ancestry, geography, history and culture and face their common 'problems' together. Introducing his book Vikings of the Sunrise, which was aimed at a general readership and would become his most popular work, he outlined how he had 'tried to tell the tale from the evidence in Polynesian myths regarding the creation of man and of islands, and in legends and traditions of the great seafaring ancestors and their voyages'. He emphasised his own 'Polynesian blood', and by implication how this gave him special insight and authority. But he equally drew on the European figure of the Viking and outlined how, to the Polynesians, 'the sunrise was the symbol of life, hope, and new lands that awaited discovery'. It was this prioneering spirit he wanted to encourage among his kinsmen - that they should embrace and conquer the new challenges and opportunites of the modern world.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Carey, J. L. (2014). Epilogue: Indigenising transnationalism? Challenges for new imperial and cosmopolitan histories. In J. L. Carey & J. Lydon (Eds.), Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange (pp. 286-293). New York: Routledge.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781317659327

Book Title


  • Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange

Start Page


  • 286

End Page


  • 293

Place Of Publication


  • New York

Abstract


  • Writing in 1938, Te Rangihiroa, Maori anthropologist and director of the Bishop Museum in Hawaii, reached out to his 'kinsmen' across the Pacific in the hope they would join together through their bonds of ancestry, geography, history and culture and face their common 'problems' together. Introducing his book Vikings of the Sunrise, which was aimed at a general readership and would become his most popular work, he outlined how he had 'tried to tell the tale from the evidence in Polynesian myths regarding the creation of man and of islands, and in legends and traditions of the great seafaring ancestors and their voyages'. He emphasised his own 'Polynesian blood', and by implication how this gave him special insight and authority. But he equally drew on the European figure of the Viking and outlined how, to the Polynesians, 'the sunrise was the symbol of life, hope, and new lands that awaited discovery'. It was this prioneering spirit he wanted to encourage among his kinsmen - that they should embrace and conquer the new challenges and opportunites of the modern world.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Carey, J. L. (2014). Epilogue: Indigenising transnationalism? Challenges for new imperial and cosmopolitan histories. In J. L. Carey & J. Lydon (Eds.), Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange (pp. 286-293). New York: Routledge.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781317659327

Book Title


  • Indigenous Networks: Mobility, Connections and Exchange

Start Page


  • 286

End Page


  • 293

Place Of Publication


  • New York