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New machine aesthetics: the radio paintings of Simon Ingram

Chapter


Abstract


  • In the early twentieth century, machine aesthetics

    were considered shorthand for a fascination for or

    celebration of the machine; a techno-utopianism and

    optimism driven by modern mechanised cultures. In

    2012 the phrase 'new aesthetics' appeared, firstly as

    a response to the kinds of images that contemporary

    machines seemed to be producing and secondly to

    the redefinitions of aesthetic awareness that these

    networked aesthetic machines suggested.2 The

    argument is that human experience and sensory

    responses are being decentred at the same time that

    machines appear to be capable of producing works

    of art.3 New aesthetics suggests a new way to think

    about the relation between an artist and a machine.

    Rather than a human picking up a tool, like the brush

    as an extension of the human hand, the artist and

    his painting machine have become a very particular

    assemblage of ftows.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Ballard, S. 2014, 'New machine aesthetics: the radio paintings of Simon Ingram', in C. Barton (ed), Simon Ingram: Painting Machines 2005 - 2014, Kerber, Bielefeld, Germany. pp. 132-137.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783866788558

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1855

Book Title


  • Simon Ingram: Painting Machines 2005 - 2014

Start Page


  • 132

End Page


  • 137

Place Of Publication


  • Bielefeld, Germany

Abstract


  • In the early twentieth century, machine aesthetics

    were considered shorthand for a fascination for or

    celebration of the machine; a techno-utopianism and

    optimism driven by modern mechanised cultures. In

    2012 the phrase 'new aesthetics' appeared, firstly as

    a response to the kinds of images that contemporary

    machines seemed to be producing and secondly to

    the redefinitions of aesthetic awareness that these

    networked aesthetic machines suggested.2 The

    argument is that human experience and sensory

    responses are being decentred at the same time that

    machines appear to be capable of producing works

    of art.3 New aesthetics suggests a new way to think

    about the relation between an artist and a machine.

    Rather than a human picking up a tool, like the brush

    as an extension of the human hand, the artist and

    his painting machine have become a very particular

    assemblage of ftows.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Ballard, S. 2014, 'New machine aesthetics: the radio paintings of Simon Ingram', in C. Barton (ed), Simon Ingram: Painting Machines 2005 - 2014, Kerber, Bielefeld, Germany. pp. 132-137.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9783866788558

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1855

Book Title


  • Simon Ingram: Painting Machines 2005 - 2014

Start Page


  • 132

End Page


  • 137

Place Of Publication


  • Bielefeld, Germany