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Experimental and theoretical study on minimum achievable foil thickness during asymmetric rolling

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Parts produced by microforming are becoming ever smaller. Similarly, the foils required in micro-machines are becoming ever thinner. The asymmetric rolling technique is capable of producing foils that are thinner than those produced by the conventional rolling technique. The difference between asymmetric rolling and conventional rolling is the 'cross-shear' zone. However, the influence of the cross-shear zone on the minimum achievable foil thickness during asymmetric rolling is still uncertain. In this paper, we report experiments designed to understand this critical influencing factor on the minimum achievable thickness in asymmetric rolling. Results showed that the minimum achievable thickness of rolled foils produced by asymmetric rolling with a rolling speed ratio of 1.3 can be reduced to about 30% of that possible by conventional rolling technique. Furthermore, the minimum achievable thickness during asymmetric rolling could be correlated to the cross-shear ratio, which, in turn, could be related to the rolling speed ratio. From the experimental results, a formula to calculate the minimum achievable thickness was established, considering the parameters cross-shear ratio, friction coefficient, work roll radius, etc. in asymmetric rolling.

Authors


  •   Tang, Delin (external author)
  •   Liu, Xianghua (external author)
  •   Song, Meng (external author)
  •   Yu, Hai Liang.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Tang, D., Liu, X., Song, M. & Yu, H. (2014). Experimental and theoretical study on minimum achievable foil thickness during asymmetric rolling. PLoS One, 9 (9), e106637-1-e106637-12.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84923206657

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4194&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/3178

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e106637-1

End Page


  • e106637-12

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • United States

Abstract


  • Parts produced by microforming are becoming ever smaller. Similarly, the foils required in micro-machines are becoming ever thinner. The asymmetric rolling technique is capable of producing foils that are thinner than those produced by the conventional rolling technique. The difference between asymmetric rolling and conventional rolling is the 'cross-shear' zone. However, the influence of the cross-shear zone on the minimum achievable foil thickness during asymmetric rolling is still uncertain. In this paper, we report experiments designed to understand this critical influencing factor on the minimum achievable thickness in asymmetric rolling. Results showed that the minimum achievable thickness of rolled foils produced by asymmetric rolling with a rolling speed ratio of 1.3 can be reduced to about 30% of that possible by conventional rolling technique. Furthermore, the minimum achievable thickness during asymmetric rolling could be correlated to the cross-shear ratio, which, in turn, could be related to the rolling speed ratio. From the experimental results, a formula to calculate the minimum achievable thickness was established, considering the parameters cross-shear ratio, friction coefficient, work roll radius, etc. in asymmetric rolling.

Authors


  •   Tang, Delin (external author)
  •   Liu, Xianghua (external author)
  •   Song, Meng (external author)
  •   Yu, Hai Liang.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Tang, D., Liu, X., Song, M. & Yu, H. (2014). Experimental and theoretical study on minimum achievable foil thickness during asymmetric rolling. PLoS One, 9 (9), e106637-1-e106637-12.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84923206657

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=4194&context=eispapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/3178

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e106637-1

End Page


  • e106637-12

Volume


  • 9

Issue


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • United States