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Grease Recovery and Dirt Removal in Wool Scouring

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Wool scouring is the process of washing greasy wool once it has been

    removed from the sheep's back. After being rinsed to remove suint

    (sweat and salt) the wool is passed through a scour bowl consisting

    of four settling tanks from which dirty water is periodically expelled.

    We consider the settling rate of dirt in each of the tanks and the

    action of the squeeze roller at the end of the scour bowl. A compartmental

    model is used to predict dirt and grease concentrations in

    each bowl as a function of time. In conjunction, computational fluid

    mechanics is used to gain a better understanding of the flows in and

    out of each settling bowl - which can then be used to improve the

    compartmental model. These calculations can be used to find' the

    optimum cycle times for purging the settling tanks and flow rates in

    and out of the system.

UOW Authors


  •   Marchant, Timothy
  •   Barry, S I (external author)
  •   Mercer, Geoff (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2003

Citation


  • Marchant, T. R., Barry, S. & Mercer, G. (2003). Grease Recovery and Dirt Removal in Wool Scouring. In J. Hewitt & K. White (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2002 Mathematics-In-Industry Study Group (pp. 106-124). Australia: MISG.

Start Page


  • 106

End Page


  • 124

Abstract


  • Wool scouring is the process of washing greasy wool once it has been

    removed from the sheep's back. After being rinsed to remove suint

    (sweat and salt) the wool is passed through a scour bowl consisting

    of four settling tanks from which dirty water is periodically expelled.

    We consider the settling rate of dirt in each of the tanks and the

    action of the squeeze roller at the end of the scour bowl. A compartmental

    model is used to predict dirt and grease concentrations in

    each bowl as a function of time. In conjunction, computational fluid

    mechanics is used to gain a better understanding of the flows in and

    out of each settling bowl - which can then be used to improve the

    compartmental model. These calculations can be used to find' the

    optimum cycle times for purging the settling tanks and flow rates in

    and out of the system.

UOW Authors


  •   Marchant, Timothy
  •   Barry, S I (external author)
  •   Mercer, Geoff (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2003

Citation


  • Marchant, T. R., Barry, S. & Mercer, G. (2003). Grease Recovery and Dirt Removal in Wool Scouring. In J. Hewitt & K. White (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2002 Mathematics-In-Industry Study Group (pp. 106-124). Australia: MISG.

Start Page


  • 106

End Page


  • 124