Skip to main content
placeholder image

Maintaining coastal and lagoonal ecosystems and productivity

Conference Paper


Download full-text (Open Access)

Abstract


  • The shallow ecosystems and productivity of mangroves, seagrass beds, coral

    reefs and inter-reef seabed are critical natural assets for food production, food

    security, cultural and recreational activities and livelihoods for many people in

    Pacific Island States. They also provide important ecosystem services in

    protection of coasts against storm surges and in production of carbonate

    sands and debris to nourish beaches and maintain islands. These

    ecosystems are easily damaged through reclamation, drainage, pollution and

    destruction of critical habitats for fish and other food species. Once destroyed,

    these ecosystems are not readily or cheaply restored or replaced.

    The paper discusses issues that should be addressed through an integrated

    process of strategic planning and design to ensure proper consideration of

    environmental, social and economic impacts in any proposal for island

    protection works.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kenchington, R. (2009). Maintaining coastal and lagoonal ecosystems and productivity. Proceedings of International Symposium on Islands and Oceans (pp. 1-11). Japan: Ocean Policy Research Foundation.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2687&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1682

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11

Abstract


  • The shallow ecosystems and productivity of mangroves, seagrass beds, coral

    reefs and inter-reef seabed are critical natural assets for food production, food

    security, cultural and recreational activities and livelihoods for many people in

    Pacific Island States. They also provide important ecosystem services in

    protection of coasts against storm surges and in production of carbonate

    sands and debris to nourish beaches and maintain islands. These

    ecosystems are easily damaged through reclamation, drainage, pollution and

    destruction of critical habitats for fish and other food species. Once destroyed,

    these ecosystems are not readily or cheaply restored or replaced.

    The paper discusses issues that should be addressed through an integrated

    process of strategic planning and design to ensure proper consideration of

    environmental, social and economic impacts in any proposal for island

    protection works.

Publication Date


  • 2009

Citation


  • Kenchington, R. (2009). Maintaining coastal and lagoonal ecosystems and productivity. Proceedings of International Symposium on Islands and Oceans (pp. 1-11). Japan: Ocean Policy Research Foundation.

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2687&context=lhapapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1682

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 11