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Supporting bachelor of nursing students within the clinical environment: perspectives of preceptors

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Student learning in the clinical environment is a cornerstone of pedagogy for students undertaking a Bachelor of Nursing in Australia.

    Method

    This paper presents the results of a survey that was conducted with registered nurses who preceptor students for universities in Australia.

    Findings

    Findings reveal that some preceptors do not hold the qualification they are preceptoring students to obtain, that university involvement in preparation of preceptors is scant and that resource provision and communication from universities to preceptors is considered problematic. Registered nurses choose to act as preceptors for reasons that are both altruistic and professional. They are often employed in senior positions and as such find it difficult to manage time and resolve role conflict.

    Conclusion

    This paper concludes that the registered nurses who preceptor students generally have a positive experience but require greater involvement by universities in their preparation, particularly when they are responsible for the direct assessment of students. The paper posits this may be best achieved by universities creating effective lines of communication and ongoing support. This will sustain collaborative and meaningful engagement with registered nurses who preceptor undergraduate students.

UOW Authors


  •   Broadbent, Marc (external author)
  •   Moxham, Lorna
  •   Sander, Teresa (external author)
  •   Walker, Sandra (external author)
  •   Dwyer, Trudy (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Broadbent, M., Moxham, L., Sander, T., Walker, S. & Dwyer, T. (2014). Supporting bachelor of nursing students within the clinical environment: perspectives of preceptors. Nurse Education in Practice, 14 (4), 403-409.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84933048689

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/2096

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 403

End Page


  • 409

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Student learning in the clinical environment is a cornerstone of pedagogy for students undertaking a Bachelor of Nursing in Australia.

    Method

    This paper presents the results of a survey that was conducted with registered nurses who preceptor students for universities in Australia.

    Findings

    Findings reveal that some preceptors do not hold the qualification they are preceptoring students to obtain, that university involvement in preparation of preceptors is scant and that resource provision and communication from universities to preceptors is considered problematic. Registered nurses choose to act as preceptors for reasons that are both altruistic and professional. They are often employed in senior positions and as such find it difficult to manage time and resolve role conflict.

    Conclusion

    This paper concludes that the registered nurses who preceptor students generally have a positive experience but require greater involvement by universities in their preparation, particularly when they are responsible for the direct assessment of students. The paper posits this may be best achieved by universities creating effective lines of communication and ongoing support. This will sustain collaborative and meaningful engagement with registered nurses who preceptor undergraduate students.

UOW Authors


  •   Broadbent, Marc (external author)
  •   Moxham, Lorna
  •   Sander, Teresa (external author)
  •   Walker, Sandra (external author)
  •   Dwyer, Trudy (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Broadbent, M., Moxham, L., Sander, T., Walker, S. & Dwyer, T. (2014). Supporting bachelor of nursing students within the clinical environment: perspectives of preceptors. Nurse Education in Practice, 14 (4), 403-409.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84933048689

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/2096

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 403

End Page


  • 409

Volume


  • 14

Issue


  • 4

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom