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Outpatient alcohol withdrawal management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Background

    There is concern from within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities about the lack of access to alcohol withdrawal management (‘detox’) services. Outpatient detox is described within national Australian guidelines as a safe option for selected drinkers. However, uncertainly exists as to how suited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are to this approach.

    Methods

    Consultations were conducted with stakeholders of four health services providing outpatient detox for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in NSW. Thematic analysis was performed to determine elements perceived as important for success.

    Results

    Key themes that emerged were individual engagement, flexibility, assessment of suitability, Aboriginal staff and community engagement, practical support, counselling, staff education and support, coping with relapse and contingency planning.

    Discussion

    There is a need to improve access to alcohol detox services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The outpatient setting seems to be a feasible and safe environment to provide this kind of service for selected drinkers.

UOW Authors


  •   Brett, Jonathan (external author)
  •   Lawrence, Leanne (external author)
  •   Ivers, Rowena
  •   Conigrave, Kate M. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Brett, J., Lawrence, L., Ivers, R. & Conigrave, K. (2014). Outpatient alcohol withdrawal management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Australian Family Physician, 43 (8), 563-566.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84905706482

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/2114

Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 563

End Page


  • 566

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Background

    There is concern from within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities about the lack of access to alcohol withdrawal management (‘detox’) services. Outpatient detox is described within national Australian guidelines as a safe option for selected drinkers. However, uncertainly exists as to how suited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are to this approach.

    Methods

    Consultations were conducted with stakeholders of four health services providing outpatient detox for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in NSW. Thematic analysis was performed to determine elements perceived as important for success.

    Results

    Key themes that emerged were individual engagement, flexibility, assessment of suitability, Aboriginal staff and community engagement, practical support, counselling, staff education and support, coping with relapse and contingency planning.

    Discussion

    There is a need to improve access to alcohol detox services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. The outpatient setting seems to be a feasible and safe environment to provide this kind of service for selected drinkers.

UOW Authors


  •   Brett, Jonathan (external author)
  •   Lawrence, Leanne (external author)
  •   Ivers, Rowena
  •   Conigrave, Kate M. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Brett, J., Lawrence, L., Ivers, R. & Conigrave, K. (2014). Outpatient alcohol withdrawal management for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Australian Family Physician, 43 (8), 563-566.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84905706482

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/2114

Number Of Pages


  • 3

Start Page


  • 563

End Page


  • 566

Volume


  • 43

Issue


  • 8

Place Of Publication


  • Australia