Skip to main content
placeholder image

Flipping the test: using student-written exams as an approach to active-learning

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Objective: The purpose of this research is to apply the notion of “flipped learning” (Berrett, 2012) to student assessment. This active-learning approach is used in a post-graduate accounting subject in which students are required to write their examination questions. Design: The subject is taught using a “flipped” approach that encourages student interaction and replaces the traditional lecture with a discussion forum where active engagement with subject material, peers, and the forum leader (lecturer) is expected. An approach to assessment consistent with this teaching and learning model was introduced to continue the active-learning theme. Students were given detailed guidelines and instructions to be followed in writing the exam questions, including comprehensive learning objectives expected from the assessment, examples for writing exam questions, format and submission criteria, and a grading rubric. The student-written questions and answers were provided to the entire class as a study aid and approximately thirty per cent of the questions were chosen for the final exam. Findings*: Studies have shown that this method of student assessment has improved the perceived and actual relevance of exam questions, increased student involvement with learning outcomes, and improved levels of student engagement (Berrett, 2012; Corrigan & Craciun, 2013; Foos, 1989; Kitchen, 2009; Kolluru, 2012; Nonacs, 2013). * Note that this research project has recently commenced and findings are not yet available. Originality/value: The addition of an active-learning assessment in the form of student-written exams is an innovation approach that facilitates a ‘bottom-up’ focus on learning rather than an autocratic, ‘top-down’ model of instructor-imposed evaluation.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Cortese, C., Pupovac, S. & Xu, L. (2013). Flipping the test: using student-written exams as an approach to active-learning. Higher Education Research & the Student Learning Experience in Business Conference

Abstract


  • Objective: The purpose of this research is to apply the notion of “flipped learning” (Berrett, 2012) to student assessment. This active-learning approach is used in a post-graduate accounting subject in which students are required to write their examination questions. Design: The subject is taught using a “flipped” approach that encourages student interaction and replaces the traditional lecture with a discussion forum where active engagement with subject material, peers, and the forum leader (lecturer) is expected. An approach to assessment consistent with this teaching and learning model was introduced to continue the active-learning theme. Students were given detailed guidelines and instructions to be followed in writing the exam questions, including comprehensive learning objectives expected from the assessment, examples for writing exam questions, format and submission criteria, and a grading rubric. The student-written questions and answers were provided to the entire class as a study aid and approximately thirty per cent of the questions were chosen for the final exam. Findings*: Studies have shown that this method of student assessment has improved the perceived and actual relevance of exam questions, increased student involvement with learning outcomes, and improved levels of student engagement (Berrett, 2012; Corrigan & Craciun, 2013; Foos, 1989; Kitchen, 2009; Kolluru, 2012; Nonacs, 2013). * Note that this research project has recently commenced and findings are not yet available. Originality/value: The addition of an active-learning assessment in the form of student-written exams is an innovation approach that facilitates a ‘bottom-up’ focus on learning rather than an autocratic, ‘top-down’ model of instructor-imposed evaluation.

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Cortese, C., Pupovac, S. & Xu, L. (2013). Flipping the test: using student-written exams as an approach to active-learning. Higher Education Research & the Student Learning Experience in Business Conference