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A review of metaphor use in sustainability literature

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Although topics concerning sustainability, including sustainability management, measurement and disclosure have been broadly studied in recent times, a comprehensively defined concept of sustainability is yet to be found in either academic or public discourse (Buhr, 2007). Following Our Common Future, the definition of sustainable development “meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” has been widely adopted as guiding principles of sustainability management and stills remains dominant (Drexhage and Murphy, 2010). Even though this definition is widely accepted, it is not without criticism. For example, vagueness, fostering delusions, overlooking ecological rationality and over emphasising of technical fixes just to name a few (see Bebbington, 2001; Banerjee, 2003; Robinson, 2004). This isn’t to say that such a definition is wrong, but perhaps a more comprehensive and structured definition would garner more agreement. Such criticism is therefore important to drive understanding of sustainability as a concept, leading it’s evolution to a more broadly accepted conceptualisation.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Huang, T., Cortese, C. & Pepper, M. (2014). A review of metaphor use in sustainability literature. Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference (pp. 1-21). Toronto, Canada: York University.

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 21

Place Of Publication


  • http://criticalperspectivesonaccounting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/paper-cpa-033.docx

Abstract


  • Although topics concerning sustainability, including sustainability management, measurement and disclosure have been broadly studied in recent times, a comprehensively defined concept of sustainability is yet to be found in either academic or public discourse (Buhr, 2007). Following Our Common Future, the definition of sustainable development “meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” has been widely adopted as guiding principles of sustainability management and stills remains dominant (Drexhage and Murphy, 2010). Even though this definition is widely accepted, it is not without criticism. For example, vagueness, fostering delusions, overlooking ecological rationality and over emphasising of technical fixes just to name a few (see Bebbington, 2001; Banerjee, 2003; Robinson, 2004). This isn’t to say that such a definition is wrong, but perhaps a more comprehensive and structured definition would garner more agreement. Such criticism is therefore important to drive understanding of sustainability as a concept, leading it’s evolution to a more broadly accepted conceptualisation.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Huang, T., Cortese, C. & Pepper, M. (2014). A review of metaphor use in sustainability literature. Critical Perspectives on Accounting Conference (pp. 1-21). Toronto, Canada: York University.

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 21

Place Of Publication


  • http://criticalperspectivesonaccounting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/paper-cpa-033.docx