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Who pays for conservation in the world’s biggest tuna fishery?

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • The world catches too many tuna. Thanks to our high levels of fishing, some tuna species are under threat. Everyone involved in the fishing industry agrees that fishing effort needs to be reduced. But no one can decide who should bear the burden of cutting back their fishery. This week the Scientific Committee to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) meets in Busan, Korea to try once more to reduce over-fishing.

    The WCPFC is the globally mandated regional fisheries management organisation for these tuna fisheries. It is required to adopt conservation measures that ensure the long-term conservation of the region’s tuna fisheries. These measures are then legally binding on the WCPFC’s member States (including Australia).

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Hanich, Q. (2012). Who pays for conservation in the world’s biggest tuna fishery?. The Conversation, (07 August),

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2558&context=lhapapers&unstamped=1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1553

Issue


  • 07 August

Place Of Publication


  • http://theconversation.com/who-pays-for-conservation-in-the-worlds-biggest-tuna-fishery-8663

Abstract


  • The world catches too many tuna. Thanks to our high levels of fishing, some tuna species are under threat. Everyone involved in the fishing industry agrees that fishing effort needs to be reduced. But no one can decide who should bear the burden of cutting back their fishery. This week the Scientific Committee to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) meets in Busan, Korea to try once more to reduce over-fishing.

    The WCPFC is the globally mandated regional fisheries management organisation for these tuna fisheries. It is required to adopt conservation measures that ensure the long-term conservation of the region’s tuna fisheries. These measures are then legally binding on the WCPFC’s member States (including Australia).

Publication Date


  • 2012

Citation


  • Hanich, Q. (2012). Who pays for conservation in the world’s biggest tuna fishery?. The Conversation, (07 August),

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2558&context=lhapapers&unstamped=1

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1553

Issue


  • 07 August

Place Of Publication


  • http://theconversation.com/who-pays-for-conservation-in-the-worlds-biggest-tuna-fishery-8663