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Technical challenges for electric power industries due to grid-integrated electric vehicles in low voltage distributions: a review

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIVs) are promising technologies for future Smart Grid (SG) and offer the

    potential to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles. The large scale deployment of GIVs without

    proper control of the time to charge the vehicles can result in unexpected challenges. This can lead to

    a disruptive impact on the current power distribution systems and in particular its substantial impacts

    in building power energy systems. Therefore, a proper model that predicts the realistic system behavior

    is required to analysis the true effects of introducing GIVs in the power grid. This paper presents a review

    of existing studies on GIV systems, their modeling techniques and their effects on power grids. Following

    a brief overview of the common types of electric vehicles (EVs) with their charging systems, a review of

    their impact on the low voltage distribution systems will be analyzed. The comprehensive review

    presented in this paper reveals that the impact of GIVs on power distribution systems can be quantified

    using the aspects of EVs, such as vehicle penetration, charging time, charging characteristics, driving

    patterns, transportation network. GIV studies are expected to be more popular in future years with the

    development of EV technologies and the government support to electricity utilities. Thereby, these

    factors will reduce the cost of energy to charge EV and enhance the practical implications of GIVs.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • A. Haidar, K. M.. Muttaqi & D. Sutanto, "Technical challenges for electric power industries due to grid-integrated electric vehicles in low voltage distributions: a review," Energy Conversion and Management, vol. 86, pp. 689-700, 2014.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84903836018

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2625

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 689

End Page


  • 700

Volume


  • 86

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Grid-Integrated Vehicles (GIVs) are promising technologies for future Smart Grid (SG) and offer the

    potential to reduce the environmental impact of vehicles. The large scale deployment of GIVs without

    proper control of the time to charge the vehicles can result in unexpected challenges. This can lead to

    a disruptive impact on the current power distribution systems and in particular its substantial impacts

    in building power energy systems. Therefore, a proper model that predicts the realistic system behavior

    is required to analysis the true effects of introducing GIVs in the power grid. This paper presents a review

    of existing studies on GIV systems, their modeling techniques and their effects on power grids. Following

    a brief overview of the common types of electric vehicles (EVs) with their charging systems, a review of

    their impact on the low voltage distribution systems will be analyzed. The comprehensive review

    presented in this paper reveals that the impact of GIVs on power distribution systems can be quantified

    using the aspects of EVs, such as vehicle penetration, charging time, charging characteristics, driving

    patterns, transportation network. GIV studies are expected to be more popular in future years with the

    development of EV technologies and the government support to electricity utilities. Thereby, these

    factors will reduce the cost of energy to charge EV and enhance the practical implications of GIVs.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • A. Haidar, K. M.. Muttaqi & D. Sutanto, "Technical challenges for electric power industries due to grid-integrated electric vehicles in low voltage distributions: a review," Energy Conversion and Management, vol. 86, pp. 689-700, 2014.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84903836018

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2625

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 11

Start Page


  • 689

End Page


  • 700

Volume


  • 86

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom