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Editorial: Media International Australia

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Until the start of this year, any attempt to communicate via the internet in our house

    in a regional area by the sea was fraught with frustration. Partly because of our choice

    of internet service provider, but largely because of geography, our home wireless signal

    frequently dropped out, requiring one of us to restart the modem every hour or so. At

    this point, we (ill-advisedly) pinned our hopes on the rollout of the National Broadband

    Network. A quick visit to the NBN Co Roll Out Map (which is helpfully online, begging

    the question what happens if you can’t get online in the first place) suggested we drag

    a curiously shaped red blob over our current address to find out where we might be in

    relation to the NBN. We were then helpfully advised that: ‘The NBN rollout has not

    started in your area. Keep checking the website for updates and more information.’ We

    are, inconveniently, only 3 kilometres north of where the rollout has stopped. Given the

    recent change of government and a revised communication agenda, that rollout may

    never embark on its Sisyphean journey up our hill. Therefore, having just gone through

    the unbelievable rigmarole of switching service providers in order to obtain a slightly

    more reliable signal, we could not help but conclude that it might actually be cheaper

    and more convenient to move.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Turnbull, S. (2014). Editorial: Media International Australia. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, (151), 1-2.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Issue


  • 151

Place Of Publication


  • Australia

Abstract


  • Until the start of this year, any attempt to communicate via the internet in our house

    in a regional area by the sea was fraught with frustration. Partly because of our choice

    of internet service provider, but largely because of geography, our home wireless signal

    frequently dropped out, requiring one of us to restart the modem every hour or so. At

    this point, we (ill-advisedly) pinned our hopes on the rollout of the National Broadband

    Network. A quick visit to the NBN Co Roll Out Map (which is helpfully online, begging

    the question what happens if you can’t get online in the first place) suggested we drag

    a curiously shaped red blob over our current address to find out where we might be in

    relation to the NBN. We were then helpfully advised that: ‘The NBN rollout has not

    started in your area. Keep checking the website for updates and more information.’ We

    are, inconveniently, only 3 kilometres north of where the rollout has stopped. Given the

    recent change of government and a revised communication agenda, that rollout may

    never embark on its Sisyphean journey up our hill. Therefore, having just gone through

    the unbelievable rigmarole of switching service providers in order to obtain a slightly

    more reliable signal, we could not help but conclude that it might actually be cheaper

    and more convenient to move.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Turnbull, S. (2014). Editorial: Media International Australia. Media International Australia Incorporating Culture and Policy: quarterly journal of media research and resources, (151), 1-2.

Number Of Pages


  • 1

Start Page


  • 1

End Page


  • 2

Issue


  • 151

Place Of Publication


  • Australia