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Bipolar disorder and criminal offending: a data linkage study

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Purpose: The current study explored criminal offending among people diagnosed with bipolar disorder with and without comorbid substance use and compared this with a community sample with no history of bipolar disorder.

    Methods: A case-linkage design was used to compare patterns of officially recorded criminal offending between 1,076 people with bipolar disorder drawn from a state-wide psychiatric case register with a community comparison group.

    Results: Those with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely than community members to be charged with, convicted of, and be found guilty of, violent, non-violent and intermediate level criminal offences. Those with a comorbid substance use disorder were two times more likely than those without a substance use disorder to offend; both groups had a significantly higher chance of offending than the community sample. Females with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely to have been convicted of violent offences, irrespective of substance use. Significant interactions were found between bipolar disorder and substance use for males and females with respect to violent offending and for males with respect to non-violent offending.

    Conclusions: There is a statistically significant association between bipolar disorder and the likelihood of having a criminal history. Co-occurring substance use differentially impacts on the likelihood of criminal offending for males and females.

UOW Authors


  •   Daff, E (external author)
  •   Thomas, Stuart DM. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Daff, E. & Thomas, S. D. M. (2014). Bipolar disorder and criminal offending: a data linkage study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: the international journal for research in social and genetic epidemiology and mental health services, 49 (12), 1985-1991.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901733810

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1360

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 1985

End Page


  • 1991

Volume


  • 49

Issue


  • 12

Abstract


  • Purpose: The current study explored criminal offending among people diagnosed with bipolar disorder with and without comorbid substance use and compared this with a community sample with no history of bipolar disorder.

    Methods: A case-linkage design was used to compare patterns of officially recorded criminal offending between 1,076 people with bipolar disorder drawn from a state-wide psychiatric case register with a community comparison group.

    Results: Those with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely than community members to be charged with, convicted of, and be found guilty of, violent, non-violent and intermediate level criminal offences. Those with a comorbid substance use disorder were two times more likely than those without a substance use disorder to offend; both groups had a significantly higher chance of offending than the community sample. Females with bipolar disorder were significantly more likely to have been convicted of violent offences, irrespective of substance use. Significant interactions were found between bipolar disorder and substance use for males and females with respect to violent offending and for males with respect to non-violent offending.

    Conclusions: There is a statistically significant association between bipolar disorder and the likelihood of having a criminal history. Co-occurring substance use differentially impacts on the likelihood of criminal offending for males and females.

UOW Authors


  •   Daff, E (external author)
  •   Thomas, Stuart DM. (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Daff, E. & Thomas, S. D. M. (2014). Bipolar disorder and criminal offending: a data linkage study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: the international journal for research in social and genetic epidemiology and mental health services, 49 (12), 1985-1991.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901733810

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1360

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 1985

End Page


  • 1991

Volume


  • 49

Issue


  • 12