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A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • Aggressiveness is highly heritable. Recent experimental work has linked individual differences in a functional polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase-A gene (MAOA) to anger-driven aggression. Other work has implicated the dorsal ACC (dACC) in cognitive-emotional control and the amygdala in emotional arousal. The present imaging genetics study investigated dACC and amygdala reactivity to induced anger control as a function of MAOA genotype. A research assistant asked 38 healthy male undergraduates to control their anger in response to an insult by a rude experimenter. Men with the low-expression allele showed increased dACC and amygdala activation after the insult, but men with the high-expression allele did not. Both dACC and amygdala activation independently mediated the relationship between MAOA genotype and self-reported anger control. Moreover, following the insult, men with the high-functioning allele showed functional decoupling between the amygdala and dACC, but men with the low-functioning allele did not. These results suggest that heightened dACC and amygdala activation and their connectivity are neuroaffective mechanisms underlying anger control in participants with the low-functioning allele of the MAOA gene.

UOW Authors


  •   Denson, Thomas F. (external author)
  •   Dobson-Stone, C (external author)
  •   Ronay, R (external author)
  •   Von Hippel, W (external author)
  •   Schira, Mark

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Denson, T. F., Dobson-Stone, C., Ronay, R., von Hippel, W. & Schira, M. M. (2014). A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 26 (7), 1418-1427.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901630306

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2461&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1462

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 1418

End Page


  • 1427

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 7

Abstract


  • Aggressiveness is highly heritable. Recent experimental work has linked individual differences in a functional polymorphism of the monoamine oxidase-A gene (MAOA) to anger-driven aggression. Other work has implicated the dorsal ACC (dACC) in cognitive-emotional control and the amygdala in emotional arousal. The present imaging genetics study investigated dACC and amygdala reactivity to induced anger control as a function of MAOA genotype. A research assistant asked 38 healthy male undergraduates to control their anger in response to an insult by a rude experimenter. Men with the low-expression allele showed increased dACC and amygdala activation after the insult, but men with the high-expression allele did not. Both dACC and amygdala activation independently mediated the relationship between MAOA genotype and self-reported anger control. Moreover, following the insult, men with the high-functioning allele showed functional decoupling between the amygdala and dACC, but men with the low-functioning allele did not. These results suggest that heightened dACC and amygdala activation and their connectivity are neuroaffective mechanisms underlying anger control in participants with the low-functioning allele of the MAOA gene.

UOW Authors


  •   Denson, Thomas F. (external author)
  •   Dobson-Stone, C (external author)
  •   Ronay, R (external author)
  •   Von Hippel, W (external author)
  •   Schira, Mark

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Denson, T. F., Dobson-Stone, C., Ronay, R., von Hippel, W. & Schira, M. M. (2014). A functional polymorphism of the MAOA gene is associated with neural responses to induced anger control. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 26 (7), 1418-1427.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901630306

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2461&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/1462

Number Of Pages


  • 9

Start Page


  • 1418

End Page


  • 1427

Volume


  • 26

Issue


  • 7