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Coastal ecosystems: a critical element of risk reduction

Journal Article


Abstract


  • The conservation of coastal ecosystems can provide considerable coastal protection

    benefits, but this role has not been sufficiently accounted for in coastal

    planning and engineering. Substantial evidence now exists showing how, and

    under what conditions, ecosystems can play a valuable function in wave and

    storm surge attenuation, erosion reduction, and in the longer term maintenance

    of the coastal profile. Both through their capacity for self repair and

    recovery, and through the often considerable cobenefits they provide, ecosystems

    can offer notable advantages over traditional engineering approaches in

    some settings. They can also be combined in “hybrid” engineering designs.

    We make 10 recommendations to encourage the utilization of existing knowledge

    and to improve the incorporation of ecosystems into policy, planning and

    funding for coastal hazard risk reduction.

UOW Authors


  •   Spalding, Mark D. (external author)
  •   McIvor, Anna L. (external author)
  •   Beck, Michael W. (external author)
  •   Koch, Evamaria W. (external author)
  •   Moller, Iris (external author)
  •   Reed, Denise J. (external author)
  •   Rubinoff, Pamela (external author)
  •   Spencer, Tom (external author)
  •   Tolhurst, Trevor J. (external author)
  •   Wamsely, Ty V. (external author)
  •   Van Wesenbeeck, Bregje K. (external author)
  •   Wolanski, Eric (external author)
  •   Woodroffe, Colin

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Spalding, M. D., McIvor, A. L., Beck, M. W., Koch, E. W., Moller, I., Reed, D. J., Rubinoff, P., Spencer, T., Tolhurst, T. J., Wamsely, T. V., van Wesenbeeck, B. K., Wolanski, E. & Woodroffe, C. D. (2014). Coastal ecosystems: a critical element of risk reduction. Conservation Letters, 7 (3), 293-301.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901685899

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1733

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 293

End Page


  • 301

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • The conservation of coastal ecosystems can provide considerable coastal protection

    benefits, but this role has not been sufficiently accounted for in coastal

    planning and engineering. Substantial evidence now exists showing how, and

    under what conditions, ecosystems can play a valuable function in wave and

    storm surge attenuation, erosion reduction, and in the longer term maintenance

    of the coastal profile. Both through their capacity for self repair and

    recovery, and through the often considerable cobenefits they provide, ecosystems

    can offer notable advantages over traditional engineering approaches in

    some settings. They can also be combined in “hybrid” engineering designs.

    We make 10 recommendations to encourage the utilization of existing knowledge

    and to improve the incorporation of ecosystems into policy, planning and

    funding for coastal hazard risk reduction.

UOW Authors


  •   Spalding, Mark D. (external author)
  •   McIvor, Anna L. (external author)
  •   Beck, Michael W. (external author)
  •   Koch, Evamaria W. (external author)
  •   Moller, Iris (external author)
  •   Reed, Denise J. (external author)
  •   Rubinoff, Pamela (external author)
  •   Spencer, Tom (external author)
  •   Tolhurst, Trevor J. (external author)
  •   Wamsely, Ty V. (external author)
  •   Van Wesenbeeck, Bregje K. (external author)
  •   Wolanski, Eric (external author)
  •   Woodroffe, Colin

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Spalding, M. D., McIvor, A. L., Beck, M. W., Koch, E. W., Moller, I., Reed, D. J., Rubinoff, P., Spencer, T., Tolhurst, T. J., Wamsely, T. V., van Wesenbeeck, B. K., Wolanski, E. & Woodroffe, C. D. (2014). Coastal ecosystems: a critical element of risk reduction. Conservation Letters, 7 (3), 293-301.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84901685899

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/smhpapers/1733

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 8

Start Page


  • 293

End Page


  • 301

Volume


  • 7

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom