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Numerical investigations of ventilation and methane flow behaviour around the longwall shearer

Conference Paper


Abstract


  • Gas management in underground coal

    mines remains a challenging issue for

    mine operators. Computational Fluid

    Dynamics (CFD) models of typical

    longwall faces have been developed and

    validated using field ventilation survey

    data. The models were then used to study

    both airflow and methane dispersion

    patterns as a result of different shearer

    cutting sequence. Modelling results show

    that shearer cutting sequence has a

    significant influence on the face

    ventilation airflow and hence gas

    accumulation around the shearer. When

    the shearer is cutting from MG towards

    TG, the maximum gas concentration

    close to the coal face can reach as high as

    2.00%, a situation which may not be

    detected timely by gas sensors currently

    mounted on the shearer. The

    accumulation of methane is more

    significant in the MG-TG pass, where the

    methane-air mixture may fall in the

    explosive range around cutting drum.

UOW Authors


  •   Ren, Ting
  •   Wang, Zhongwei (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Ren, T. & Wang, Z. (2013). Numerical investigations of ventilation and methane flow behaviour around the longwall shearer. 3rd International Workshop on Mine Hazards Prevention and Control (pp. 192-198). United States: Atlantis Press.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2405

Start Page


  • 192

End Page


  • 198

Abstract


  • Gas management in underground coal

    mines remains a challenging issue for

    mine operators. Computational Fluid

    Dynamics (CFD) models of typical

    longwall faces have been developed and

    validated using field ventilation survey

    data. The models were then used to study

    both airflow and methane dispersion

    patterns as a result of different shearer

    cutting sequence. Modelling results show

    that shearer cutting sequence has a

    significant influence on the face

    ventilation airflow and hence gas

    accumulation around the shearer. When

    the shearer is cutting from MG towards

    TG, the maximum gas concentration

    close to the coal face can reach as high as

    2.00%, a situation which may not be

    detected timely by gas sensors currently

    mounted on the shearer. The

    accumulation of methane is more

    significant in the MG-TG pass, where the

    methane-air mixture may fall in the

    explosive range around cutting drum.

UOW Authors


  •   Ren, Ting
  •   Wang, Zhongwei (external author)

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Ren, T. & Wang, Z. (2013). Numerical investigations of ventilation and methane flow behaviour around the longwall shearer. 3rd International Workshop on Mine Hazards Prevention and Control (pp. 192-198). United States: Atlantis Press.

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/2405

Start Page


  • 192

End Page


  • 198