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Experimental investigation into biomechanical and biotribological properties of a real intestine and their significance for design of a spiral-type robotic capsule

Journal Article


Abstract


  • This article reports on the results and implications of our experimental investigation into the biomechanical and biotribological properties of a real intestine for the optimal design of a spiral-type robotic capsule. Dynamic shear experiments were conducted to evaluate how the storage and loss moduli and damping factor of the small intestine change with the speed or the angular frequency. The sliding friction between differently shaped test pieces, with a topology similar to that of the spirals, and the intestine sample was experimentally determined. Our findings demonstrate that the intestine's biomechanical and biotribological properties are coupled, suggesting that the sliding friction is strongly related to the internal friction of the intestinal tissue. The significant implication of this finding is that one can predict the reaction force between the capsule with a spiral-type traction topology and the intestine directly from the intestine's biomechanical measurements rather than employing complicated three-dimensional finite element analysis or an inaccurate analytical model. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted with bar-shaped solid samples to determine the sliding friction between the samples and the small intestine. This sliding friction data will be useful in determining spiral material for an optimally designed robotic capsule.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Zhou, H., Alici, G., Than, T. D. & Li, W. (2014). Experimental investigation into biomechanical and biotribological properties of a real intestine and their significance for design of a spiral-type robotic capsule. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 228 (3), 280-286.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84902126636

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/3296

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 280

End Page


  • 286

Volume


  • 228

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • This article reports on the results and implications of our experimental investigation into the biomechanical and biotribological properties of a real intestine for the optimal design of a spiral-type robotic capsule. Dynamic shear experiments were conducted to evaluate how the storage and loss moduli and damping factor of the small intestine change with the speed or the angular frequency. The sliding friction between differently shaped test pieces, with a topology similar to that of the spirals, and the intestine sample was experimentally determined. Our findings demonstrate that the intestine's biomechanical and biotribological properties are coupled, suggesting that the sliding friction is strongly related to the internal friction of the intestinal tissue. The significant implication of this finding is that one can predict the reaction force between the capsule with a spiral-type traction topology and the intestine directly from the intestine's biomechanical measurements rather than employing complicated three-dimensional finite element analysis or an inaccurate analytical model. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted with bar-shaped solid samples to determine the sliding friction between the samples and the small intestine. This sliding friction data will be useful in determining spiral material for an optimally designed robotic capsule.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Zhou, H., Alici, G., Than, T. D. & Li, W. (2014). Experimental investigation into biomechanical and biotribological properties of a real intestine and their significance for design of a spiral-type robotic capsule. Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 228 (3), 280-286.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84902126636

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/eispapers/3296

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 6

Start Page


  • 280

End Page


  • 286

Volume


  • 228

Issue


  • 3

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom