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Medicalization in schools

Chapter


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Abstract


  • Medicalization can be characterized as the product of processes that seek to put

    social problems into a medical framework This process of placing phenomena

    into a medical framework has become more commonplace (Conrad, 2007, p. 88;

    Conrad & Schneider, 1992; Zola, 1972) with the concept being examined in

    relation to a number of areas, including: sex (Hansen, 1992); ADHD (Conrad,

    1975); racialization (Kew, 2009); sleep (Kroker, 2007; Seale, Boden, Williams,

    Lowe, & Steinberg, 2007); pregnancy and birth (Arney, 1982; Walzer Leavitt,

    1986); shyness (Lane, 2007); menopause (Bell, 1987); and psychiatry (Lunbeck,

    1994). There are a number of disciplines and perspectives on medicalization,

    including sociology of health, critical psychology, critical psychiatry, history

    and philosophy of medicine, medical anthropology, and the sociology of medicine.

    In education, the issue of medicalization has been examined in terms of a

    number of considerations, such as inclusion (Isaksson, Lindqvist, & Bergstrom,

    2010) and refugee students (Taylor & Kaur Sidhu, 2012).

Publication Date


  • 2014

Edition


  • 2

Citation


  • Harwood, V. & McMahon, S. (2014). Medicalization in schools. In L. Florian (Ed.), The SAGE Handbook of Special Education (pp. 915-930). Los Angeles: SAGE.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781446210536

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84949921117

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1609&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/610

Book Title


  • The SAGE Handbook of Special Education

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 915

End Page


  • 930

Place Of Publication


  • Los Angeles

Abstract


  • Medicalization can be characterized as the product of processes that seek to put

    social problems into a medical framework This process of placing phenomena

    into a medical framework has become more commonplace (Conrad, 2007, p. 88;

    Conrad & Schneider, 1992; Zola, 1972) with the concept being examined in

    relation to a number of areas, including: sex (Hansen, 1992); ADHD (Conrad,

    1975); racialization (Kew, 2009); sleep (Kroker, 2007; Seale, Boden, Williams,

    Lowe, & Steinberg, 2007); pregnancy and birth (Arney, 1982; Walzer Leavitt,

    1986); shyness (Lane, 2007); menopause (Bell, 1987); and psychiatry (Lunbeck,

    1994). There are a number of disciplines and perspectives on medicalization,

    including sociology of health, critical psychology, critical psychiatry, history

    and philosophy of medicine, medical anthropology, and the sociology of medicine.

    In education, the issue of medicalization has been examined in terms of a

    number of considerations, such as inclusion (Isaksson, Lindqvist, & Bergstrom,

    2010) and refugee students (Taylor & Kaur Sidhu, 2012).

Publication Date


  • 2014

Edition


  • 2

Citation


  • Harwood, V. & McMahon, S. (2014). Medicalization in schools. In L. Florian (Ed.), The SAGE Handbook of Special Education (pp. 915-930). Los Angeles: SAGE.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9781446210536

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84949921117

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1609&context=sspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/610

Book Title


  • The SAGE Handbook of Special Education

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • 915

End Page


  • 930

Place Of Publication


  • Los Angeles