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National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders

Journal Article


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Abstract


  • The digitalisation of patient health data to provide national electronic health record systems (NEHRS) is a major objective of many governments. Proponents claim that NEHRS will streamline care, reduce mistakes and cut costs. However, building these systems has proved highly problematic. Using recent developments in Australia as an example, we argue that a hitherto unexamined source of difficulty concerns the way NEHRS disrupt the moral orders governing the production, ownership, use of and responsibility for health records. Policies that pursue digitalisation as a self-evident ‘solution’ to problems in healthcare without due regard to these disruptions risk alienating key stakeholders. We propose a more emergent approach to the development and implementation of NEHRS that supports moral re-ordering around rights and responsibilities appropriate to the intentions of those involved in healthcare relationships.

Authors


  •   Martin, Mike (external author)
  •   McLoughlin, Ian (external author)
  •   Zelle, Gregor (external author)
  •   Wilson, Robert G. (external author)
  •   Garrety, Karin H.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Garrety, K., McLoughlin, I., Wilson, R. G., Zelle, G. & Martin, M. (2014). National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders. Social Science and Medicine, 101 70-77.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84894106441

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1302&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/300

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 70

End Page


  • 77

Volume


  • 101

Abstract


  • The digitalisation of patient health data to provide national electronic health record systems (NEHRS) is a major objective of many governments. Proponents claim that NEHRS will streamline care, reduce mistakes and cut costs. However, building these systems has proved highly problematic. Using recent developments in Australia as an example, we argue that a hitherto unexamined source of difficulty concerns the way NEHRS disrupt the moral orders governing the production, ownership, use of and responsibility for health records. Policies that pursue digitalisation as a self-evident ‘solution’ to problems in healthcare without due regard to these disruptions risk alienating key stakeholders. We propose a more emergent approach to the development and implementation of NEHRS that supports moral re-ordering around rights and responsibilities appropriate to the intentions of those involved in healthcare relationships.

Authors


  •   Martin, Mike (external author)
  •   McLoughlin, Ian (external author)
  •   Zelle, Gregor (external author)
  •   Wilson, Robert G. (external author)
  •   Garrety, Karin H.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Garrety, K., McLoughlin, I., Wilson, R. G., Zelle, G. & Martin, M. (2014). National electronic health records and the digital disruption of moral orders. Social Science and Medicine, 101 70-77.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84894106441

Ro Full-text Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1302&context=buspapers

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/buspapers/300

Has Global Citation Frequency


Number Of Pages


  • 7

Start Page


  • 70

End Page


  • 77

Volume


  • 101