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Lack of sleep could increase obesity in children and too much television could be partly to blame

Journal Article


Abstract


  • Aim

    To examine the bidirectional relationship between short sleep duration and body mass index (BMI). A secondary aim was to investigate whether reduced physical activity and increased screen time (television and computer use) mediated these associations.

    Methods

    This study utilised data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, which is an observational cohort study of Australian children. The sample included 2984 (52.4% boys) children followed from 4 to 5 years of age until 8 to 9 years of age. Sleep duration, screen time and covariates were reported by parents, with BMI measured objectively. Cross-lagged modelling investigated the bidirectional association between sleep duration and BMI; lagged panel mediation modelling examined physical activity and screen time as potential mediators.

    Results

    Short sleep duration at 4 to 5 years of age was significantly associated with higher BMI at 8 to 9 years of age (β= −.07, p = .044). The relationship between short sleep duration at 4 to 5 years of age and higher BMI at 8 to 9 years of age was partially mediated by increased television viewing at 6 to 7 years of age (β = −.01, 95% confidence interval [−.02, −.002]).

    Conclusion

    Short sleep duration could be a risk factor for obesity in children. Increased television viewing may be one mechanism underlying this longitudinal relationship.

UOW Authors


  •   Magee, Christopher (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter
  •   Iverson, Donald C.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Magee, C., Caputi, P. & Iverson, D. (2014). Lack of sleep could increase obesity in children and too much television could be partly to blame. Acta Paediatrica: promoting child health, 103 (1), e27-e31.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84890947773

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/450

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e27

End Page


  • e31

Volume


  • 103

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom

Abstract


  • Aim

    To examine the bidirectional relationship between short sleep duration and body mass index (BMI). A secondary aim was to investigate whether reduced physical activity and increased screen time (television and computer use) mediated these associations.

    Methods

    This study utilised data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, which is an observational cohort study of Australian children. The sample included 2984 (52.4% boys) children followed from 4 to 5 years of age until 8 to 9 years of age. Sleep duration, screen time and covariates were reported by parents, with BMI measured objectively. Cross-lagged modelling investigated the bidirectional association between sleep duration and BMI; lagged panel mediation modelling examined physical activity and screen time as potential mediators.

    Results

    Short sleep duration at 4 to 5 years of age was significantly associated with higher BMI at 8 to 9 years of age (β= −.07, p = .044). The relationship between short sleep duration at 4 to 5 years of age and higher BMI at 8 to 9 years of age was partially mediated by increased television viewing at 6 to 7 years of age (β = −.01, 95% confidence interval [−.02, −.002]).

    Conclusion

    Short sleep duration could be a risk factor for obesity in children. Increased television viewing may be one mechanism underlying this longitudinal relationship.

UOW Authors


  •   Magee, Christopher (external author)
  •   Caputi, Peter
  •   Iverson, Donald C.

Publication Date


  • 2014

Citation


  • Magee, C., Caputi, P. & Iverson, D. (2014). Lack of sleep could increase obesity in children and too much television could be partly to blame. Acta Paediatrica: promoting child health, 103 (1), e27-e31.

Scopus Eid


  • 2-s2.0-84890947773

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/sspapers/450

Has Global Citation Frequency


Start Page


  • e27

End Page


  • e31

Volume


  • 103

Issue


  • 1

Place Of Publication


  • United Kingdom