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Introduction: Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World

Chapter


Abstract


  • Much has been written in recent years about the death of journalism, particularly in its longer

    investigative form. Various reasons have been posited for this, including the impact of technology,

    changing media consumption habits, and a decline in the profitability of traditional media platforms.

    In fact, this last-mentioned commercial perspective has driven some extraordinary pronouncements

    about the link between falling profits and significant journalism. Consider this: in September 2012

    Simon Marais, who runs the funds management group that was the second-largest shareholder in Fairfax

    Media, told one of Australia's most respected journalists, Gideon Haigh, that what Haigh stood for

    actually didn't matter any more. 'If you don't make money you're gone. Not only must you make money

    you must also maximise your profits. That's what you're there for. You're not there to provide great quality journalism'

    (Haigh 2012).

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Tanner, S. J.. & Richardson, N. (2013). Introduction: Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World. In S. J.. Tanner & N. Richardson (Eds.), Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World (pp. 3-9). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195518337

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1021

Book Title


  • Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World

Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • South Melbourne

Abstract


  • Much has been written in recent years about the death of journalism, particularly in its longer

    investigative form. Various reasons have been posited for this, including the impact of technology,

    changing media consumption habits, and a decline in the profitability of traditional media platforms.

    In fact, this last-mentioned commercial perspective has driven some extraordinary pronouncements

    about the link between falling profits and significant journalism. Consider this: in September 2012

    Simon Marais, who runs the funds management group that was the second-largest shareholder in Fairfax

    Media, told one of Australia's most respected journalists, Gideon Haigh, that what Haigh stood for

    actually didn't matter any more. 'If you don't make money you're gone. Not only must you make money

    you must also maximise your profits. That's what you're there for. You're not there to provide great quality journalism'

    (Haigh 2012).

Publication Date


  • 2013

Citation


  • Tanner, S. J.. & Richardson, N. (2013). Introduction: Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World. In S. J.. Tanner & N. Richardson (Eds.), Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World (pp. 3-9). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

International Standard Book Number (isbn) 13


  • 9780195518337

Ro Metadata Url


  • http://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/1021

Book Title


  • Journalism Research and Investigation in a Digital World

Start Page


  • 3

End Page


  • 9

Place Of Publication


  • South Melbourne